what machine is this?

dd
@dd
01/07/16 01:54:23PM
14 posts

Hi, i just need some little help. I want to know what machine this (image attached) is?
I saw it at a few chocolatiers and it seems it is something for cocking and mixing? (one picture with where cream is inside in the other picture there are caramelized nuts inside).
Does someone know this machine?
friendly regards, dd

machine1.jpg
machine1.jpg  •  70KB

machine2.jpg
machine2.jpg  •  55KB

Sebastian
@sebastian
01/07/16 07:19:46PM
754 posts

hard to say from the photo.  could be a stephan mixer / kettle.

Clay Gordon
@clay
01/08/16 01:19:16PM
1,680 posts

It's a product from CadixPro in France. Similar to a Stephan or RoboQbo.http://www.cadixpro.com/portfolios/sugar-cooker/?lang=en




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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
dd
@dd
01/09/16 09:56:23AM
14 posts

thank you for the answers

I was more interested in the function of this machine. It seems that (2nd picture) it is used to heat up cream (for a ganache) and later it is put together with the chocolate into a stephan mixer. I am curious about why to use such a machine to heat up(cock) cream? or is it because of quantity.

Sebastian
@sebastian
01/09/16 12:14:56PM
754 posts

I've never used a cadix, but these types of things are useful as they're high shear, heated mixers.  Some of them can pull a vacuum.  Very good at mixing things up and cooking them simultaneously.  In a ganache, heating the cream can help form a better emulsion, and if you get it hot enough, can help with shelf life.

Clay Gordon
@clay
01/10/16 10:15:10PM
1,680 posts

There is no particular reason to heat up cream in the Cadix and transfer it to a Stephan unless the Stephan has a vacuum attachment and the Cadix does not. If that's the case, then it may simply be a volume issue - the Cadix is a large heated vessel. You can get Cadix Pros with vacuum attachments.

As Sebastian points out, heating the cream to a certain point can help with shelf life and a high shear mixer is good for creating stable emulsions.

If your volume requirements are much smaller and you don't need the vacuum, something like a HotMix Gastro Pro might be worth looking at.




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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
dd
@dd
01/11/16 05:07:00PM
14 posts

Thank you for the information. Sounds logic to use either a stephan mixer OR a Cadix but not together.

ok, the reason why I am so interested in such things is because i tried some great ganaches from top chocolatiers from paris, like henri le roux or patrick roger, and (apart from there delicious taste) they got a very smooth and still cutable ganache. Especially I like the texture of the ganache. I made alot of ganaches by myself and never got that smooth and fine texture (tried alot of different ratios, added glucose,invert,sorbit,hony,...), so I was thinking it has something to do with my equipment (hand blender) and so i started looking what they use (and found the machine which you see in the pictures).
After seeing that alot chocolatiers use a stephan mixer with vacuum I am thinking my process adds some air into the ganache which affect the texture. unfortunatly these machines are very expensive.

Does someone made similar experience?

edit: or maybe to summarize: Does a Vacuum mixer (like Stephan) makes a different texture than a handmade (or hand blender-made) ganache?


updated by @dd: 01/11/16 05:11:18PM
Sebastian
@sebastian
01/11/16 08:56:29PM
754 posts

All you really need is a good stick mixer (burr blender), and a recipe you're happy with.  You can make a fantastically wonderful ganache without spending 10's of thousands in capital.  If you're not satisfied with the ganaches you're currently making, i don't think an expensive piece of equipment will change that.  Not knowing your details, i'd focus on the recipe.  if by hand blender you mean a beater blender (two rotating beater blades), i'd suggest you consider an inexpensive stick blender (it's a very high RPM/shear mixer where the blades meet the ingredients; downside is that it's a small unit, so it takes longer to get full contact with all the ingredients)

Gap
@gap
01/11/16 10:49:26PM
182 posts

I agree with Sebastian. A good stick blender (I paid $50 for mine) can give you a wonderfully smooth ganache (and I've eaten more than my fair share of Parisian chocolates)

dd
@dd
01/15/16 06:31:50AM
14 posts

By "hand blender" i meant a stick blender. Thank you for the response that i dont have to invest that much money :-) . Maybe i will invest a little bit in a better stick blender (more rpm) since mine is really old and not made for 2 kg batches. I also will try to optimize my recipe for ganache. Just for information: I ONLY make ganache to cut and coat it later in our enrobing line. So i try to make the recipe as smooth and fine as possible which is still "cut-able". I also make a bottom and a top chocolate (foot?)  and cut it with the guitarcutter while the top (foot?) still soft to get perfect edges. This works great for me. Still i will experiment more for finding a better recipe.
So i guess the Vacuum unit at some mixers is only good for better shelf life and doesnt affect the texture of the ganache. 

(sry for my "not so well" english :) )

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