Forum Activity for @Richard Foley

Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/15/11 06:22:02PM
48 posts

White chocolate instead of cocoa butter on molds


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You can buy colored cocoa butter also, ready to use. We sell it at Qzina, as well as just the colors, and we also sell plain cocoa butter in small wafers. Ultimately the best looking product will come if you can spray it. Many use simple heated paint sprayers, and build a curtain around your spray area as the fine powder goes everywhere.If you live outside North America, any chocolatensupplier should also carry butter, or a bakery distributor.If you tell me exactly where you are I can check with our export Dep't in Antwerp to suggest a likely distributor.
Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/15/11 01:20:53PM
48 posts

Ball Mill refiners vs Roller Refiners


Posted in: Chocolate Education

And please forgive my typos as I am traveling and iPad typing is not the easiest.
Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/15/11 01:17:40PM
48 posts

Ball Mill refiners vs Roller Refiners


Posted in: Chocolate Education

On the startup method, I was thinking mote startup of larger volumes, not the small Cocoa town or Alchemy type customer but more small to mid size commercial manufacturers, like Tcho for example. They use Mackentyres, but again I see very few other than the big guys using roller refiners, yet some of the best chocolate from a fineness and consistency comes from the bigh guys. I did a project with Frank Callebaut a few years ago where we spec'd out a million lb a year factory, and in ere we had. Two roll followed by a five roller refiner. I have been buying chocolate for the last 30 years from nearly every major producer in the world, totaling hundreds of millions of pounds, and the roller refiner factories in my opinion, from a consistency, viscosity, fineness, smoothness perspective, have always been the best. One can argue bean origins, flavor profiles, fruitiness, etc, but I like to rely equally on process quality.Yesterday I spent the day at BLT. I was very impressed with the roaster, winnower, and we made chocolate the whole day. This lab style equipment is very top quality, tough as nails. I am not sure if there is a Better way to make small batches of liquor from nibs, as their hammer milling liquor required 3 passes to get to 90 microns from the broken nibs. I would like to find a better way if one exists. From there we Ent on to their ball mill refiner, and made some decent chocolate. I don't quite understand the ball mill finished product (no conching?)........ Every European factory I have been to emphasizes the conching importance. I have more to learn here. Help me out if you know.
Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/14/11 09:56:43PM
48 posts

Ball Mill refiners vs Roller Refiners


Posted in: Chocolate Education

I am researching the differences between making or shall I say refining chcolate and ingredient mixes on a ball mill refiner versus roller refiner process. There seems to be a difference of opinion. I must say the finest chocolate I have tasted most often comes off a roller refined, dry conch and then wet conch system. Recently in researching bean to bar production for our teaching institute opening in Irvine this fall, I find most startups using ball refining. I think this may be due to the abundance of used equipment and a more simple process. Lots of Macintyres and the like on the market, and old conches. I have seen that dry conching is not a possibility with ball refining.

See on this link a study done on ball mill refining if interested. I wish I had more info on the differences between the two. Ideally I would like to setup both systems in our training institute if money permits so we can find our own answers but if you have any opinion or oher scientific input, please let me know.

http://www.aseanfood.info/Articles/11020318.pdf

I would like to see comparable data on roller refined chocolate. Again I go back to the best of the best, and it always seems to come off roller refiners.
updated by @Richard Foley: 04/11/15 11:32:45AM
Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/10/11 11:36:17AM
48 posts

Santha Melangeurs


Posted in: Geek Gear - Cool Tools

Soon you will be able to visit our new facility in Orange County, Ca. There you will be able to learn everything you need to know about making chocolate, truly from Bean to Bar. The Qzina Institute will open in September, together with the Stephane Treand Art of Pastry School. We will have numerous machines to test, along with a big variety of beans, and other ingredients. We also carry molds, small and large tempering machines, melters, tools, flavors, powders, and all kinds of ingredients for Chocolate, Dessert, and Pastry Professionals. The Institute will have Small Melangers from both Cocoatown and Alchemy, roasters, winnowers, grinders, and even larger (mid size) equipment for more serious production. We are working onhaving commercial roller refiners and conches for 2012. The idea is to teach customers andenthusiastseverything from how to source the beans, to various production methods, and from there ourin house Chocolatier and Pastry ChefFrancois Mellet, with assistance from MOF (Best Craftsmanof France) Stephane Treand, can teach you how to make incredible top quality truffles, fillings, cakes, pastries, andchocolates.We are not a school, butmore of anR&D institute for the industry. We will also display machinery in our showroom from a host of top manufactures, including enrobers, mills, small processing equipment, etc. We also stockmost of the top chocolates of the world, from Callebaut to Valhona to Guittard, and many many more, for those wanting to supplimentproduction. We also have refined liquor,cacao butter, nibs,on and on. Contact us for more information. We are justoutfitting our new building now, and hope to be ready in Sept or October. This is a facility like no other in the United States, located minutes fromNewport Beach Airport, Irvine Spectrum Mall, andDisneyland (for those who want a side trip), half way between L.A. and San Diego.

Richard Foley
@Richard Foley
06/07/11 11:29:16AM
48 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

David,

We have several JKV Machines for sale, used, and similar copies as well. In simple terms, JKV (Prefamac, and similar) are melters with mixing wheels and agitation. The skill of tempering is still needed, only a few tools assist you. The key to tempering is TIME, TEMPERATURE, MOVEMENT. On a JKV you set the temperature, the machine moves the chocolate, and you wait for it to be tempered. However if you are not experienced, the machine does not do it for you. You must seed the machine with wafers or tempered solid chunks in order to cool it and slightly re heat to get final temper (experience and precision)

The Selmi on the other hand has a built in cooling unit, and computerized controller, therefore it does a Batch of chocolate, cools, mixes, and final re-heat automatically. This is more forgiving and takes less skill.

On the other hand if you are doing alot of moulding the JKV delivers chocolate via the spout, and has a built in vibrator, great for doing molded pralines, once you get the hang of tempering yourself. THe Selmi has attachments for this, but pricier.

I have used a whole variety of semi automatic machines over the years, and fully automated continuous machines. One thing I can advise is when it comes to tempering, dont take short cuts. The time you will waste, product you will spoil, and frustration you will have will cost far more over time than the cost of buying a top quality tempering machine in the beginning.


updated by @Richard Foley: 09/12/15 10:47:06PM
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