what is praline, as an ingredient?

Nicole5
@nicole5
07/30/16 04:51:00PM
35 posts

I am reading one of Jean-Pierre Wybauw's books, and "praline" is an ingredient in many formulas.  I've always considered a praline a finished product.  Can anyone enlighten me on what this ingredient is?  Thank you!


updated by @nicole5: 08/04/16 11:57:50AM
ChocolatsNobles
@chocolatsnobles
07/30/16 06:36:10PM
24 posts

Oh, "praline"....such a complicated little word. Where I'm from - New Orleans - and the rest of the Southern US, the praline is a crystallized-sugar pecan confection (pro-tip: the less-traditional kind with cream are awesome for the 1st 5-10 minutes of their life...after that, "meh.") which was adapted from the almond version born in France. In modern day France, Belgium, and most of Europe, a praliné is a bonbon or an enrobed chocolate (tbh- not positive if it's used for both molded and enrobed).

However, I'd guess Wybauw means the third option: praline paste. Some consider the traditional version to be simply caramelized hazelnut paste, while others say it's a caramelized mixture of hazelnuts and almonds made into a paste, and still others would say any caramelized nut paste will do depending on your recipe and whims. One simply caramelizes the nuts (Untoasted! They will cook in the caramel.) and processes them in a food processor until the nuts express their oils and a paste forms. Google "praline paste" and you'll find some recipes. 

Bon Appétit!


updated by @chocolatsnobles: 07/30/16 06:38:41PM
Clay Gordon
@clay
07/31/16 04:35:05PM
1,680 posts

Praline is one of the most overloaded words in chocolate, and what you are talking about depends on spelling and pronunciation. The origin of the term is reputed to be the household of the Gilbert Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, where caramelized nuts were first accidentally cooked.

Praline (pray-leen). The words the Belgians use the way the French use bon bon. Usually a shell-molded piece, but it can refer to hand-rolled and slabbed/enrobed pieces as well.

Praliné (prah-li-nay). This is a caramelized nut paste. However, it can also refer to caramelized nuts (especially when referring to the products of Mazet de Montargis). A coarse (not completely refined) praliné is often referred to as praliné l'ancienne (ancient).

Praline (prah-leen). This is what Christopher is referring to as being from New Orleans. Usually a disk of caramelized sugar (below hard crack) dotted with pecans.




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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/

updated by @clay: 07/31/16 04:37:39PM
Nicole5
@nicole5
07/31/16 08:02:22PM
35 posts

Okay, I think it is Clay's option 2, (prah-li-nay), based on the spelling with the accent on the 'e', which is in the book.  Do you know if it's available for purchase in larger quantities, or do I have to make my own?  Any recommendations?

ChocolatsNobles
@chocolatsnobles
07/31/16 09:10:30PM
24 posts

Jeez - I even checked my trusty text (Peter Greweling's Chocolates & Confections, 2nd ed., p.277) to make sure the accent was correct. Thanks a lot, Greweling!

Anyway, as I mentioned, you can still Google "praline paste" (or "praliné") and find recipes or sites that sell it in bulk (e.g., Callebaut). It's not difficult to make, though if you need a bunch you can buy it. 

Clay Gordon
@clay
08/01/16 11:25:28AM
1,680 posts

Christopher is right in saying that it can be made quite easily. A Robot Coupe should easily be handle it depending on the consistency you're looking for. Smaller blenders (even Vita Mixes) are underpowered in my experience.

You can also purchase praliné paste. Callebaut is one option, as are Felchlin, Valrhona, and others. I would look to AgriMontana as well (they, along with Domori, are owned Illy) but they make the nut ingredients for Domori. Very good. But - take a look at the ingredients list, especially on cheaper products as they may not be clean label.




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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Albert Kirchmayr
@albert-kirchmayr
09/27/16 07:06:46PM
6 posts

In Germany we use the name Praline for confections enrobed in Chocolate.

Clay Gordon
@clay
09/27/16 08:20:24PM
1,680 posts

Albert Kirchmayr:

In Germany we use the name Praline for confections enrobed in Chocolate.

As do the Belgians. The French would use bon bon (good good).




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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Erik Stam
@erik-stam
09/28/16 10:42:28PM
2 posts

The Dutch use bonbon as well as a description of a filled chocolate. I truly enjoy Jean Pierre Wybauw books. There is so much more in his books than just the typical recipes and photograps. If I wouldnt already have his books, I would most certainly get the Ultimate Fine Chocolate book that is coming out next month. I had the privelege of taking a few clases from him and he is one of the kindest and most knowledgeable chocolatiers I know.

Greg Gould
@greg-gould
10/12/16 03:49:06PM
68 posts

I've made my own praline paste and I've used canned.  Honestly, the canned tastes more like what people expect from hazelnut, and the consistency is better, but I keep making mine from scratch.  Usually, when it's from a can, it's just roasted nuts and sugar that hasn't been caramelized.

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