Forum Activity for @Daniel O'Doherty

Daniel O'Doherty
@Daniel O'Doherty
10/21/10 04:06:28AM
4 posts

Cocoa butter and cocoa solids


Posted in: Tasting Notes

Left this out: we use a dry-type bacterial incubator to approximate the temperatures in larger natural ferments... we incubate with different temperature curves but typically between 35 - 50 C.
Daniel O'Doherty
@Daniel O'Doherty
10/21/10 03:57:32AM
4 posts

Cocoa butter and cocoa solids


Posted in: Tasting Notes

For small-scale ferments we've been using acrylic and polycarbonate cylinders with a perforated drainage plate and sweatings reservoir. We drop a disk of the same material into the cylinder to cap the fresh seed/pulp. I've experimented with inoculating using both yeasts and Acetobacter pasteurianus. With very small fermentations we've found that with no inoculation at all, it's a total crapshoot with regard to yeast/bacteria/mold competition... with the molds winning most of the time and ruining the entire mass. In contrast, too much yeast inoculant appears to completely inhibit the acetic phase, much to the detriment of the finished product. One of the signs of a complete ferment including Acetobacter spp. (besides the vinegar reek) is a rapid and easily observable reddish darkening of the pulp and seed coat.The harvest season in Hawaii is starting very soon, so there will be a lot more research regarding post-harvest handling and fermentation in Hawaii this winter.

Daniel O'Doherty
@Daniel O'Doherty
12/12/09 06:11:12PM
4 posts

Cocoa butter and cocoa solids


Posted in: Tasting Notes

Winnowed nibs from three different trees on Oahu. All beans were fermented, dried, and roasted in the same manner and with the same conditions. Very different flavors when made into single tree chocolate bars.


updated by @Daniel O'Doherty: 09/08/15 07:47:01PM
Daniel O'Doherty
@Daniel O'Doherty
09/30/09 12:52:13AM
4 posts

Cocoa butter and cocoa solids


Posted in: Tasting Notes

Hi,I have a friend who is huge fan of such products and makes such chocolate himself; he uses the term "unroasted chocolate". I'm not sure that the term raw is always used correctly, especially with regard to "raw chocolate". Unless the beans used to make this "raw, unprocessed, organic..." chocolate are unfermented, it cannot formally be considered raw. Yes, they may not be cooked in the traditional sense, but the fermentation of cacao pulp causes the bean temperature to rise around 40 C and higher in some instances, and this is at or above the limit specified by many raw foodists.