Forum Activity for @Linda Grishman

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/01/12 04:39:36PM
26 posts

I don't get it?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Oi! va voy!

If it was that simple to just melt an already tempered bar more people would be making chocolate. When you get a shipment of chocolate (whether you buy from any of the producers i.e. Guittard, you still have to temper the chocolate. Bars typically weigh 10 lbs.

You need to melt the bar to around 120F. Then you need to add a few lumps of the tempered chocolate from the remaining bar or new bar. At that point turn the temp down to 82F. At this point you need to mix the batch until it reaches around 82F. Remove the lumps and turn up the temp to around 90F. Keep mixing until you reach 90F. At that point you can begin using the chocolate. HOWEVER, you need to maintain that temperature throughout the process otherwise it will go out of temper.

Now,there is a lot of trial and error in making chocolate. You need to practice until you get it right.

Best of luck,

Linda

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
06/07/11 01:26:04PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi Clay:

Since I have spent years with a variety of engineers who were useless, to put it mildly. I am confident that the pump will do the job. I don't mind waiting few more months to make sure that this time I will have a great piece of machinery. It will also be able to handle larger inclusions like whole almonds.

As soon as I have a working model and have thoroughly tested it, I will let you know.

Hope all is well. When are you coming to Vermont again!

Linda

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
06/03/11 10:51:48PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi David,

I tested one for them a number of years ago. The pump was so slow that I could have filled my molds by hand 10 times over.

I know that they have a bunch of new products though. If you are interested in a metering pump, I am having one made later this year.

It has been a long and arduous task getting good engineers to make it. This pump will be able to take larger inclusions and the cleaning is simple and quick. Most component will have quick disconnects.

If you like I'll put your name on my mailing list.

Best,

Linda

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
05/26/11 01:13:04PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi Antonio. I am a former South African. Have lived in the USA since 1976. Started my business in 1985 out of my NYC apt. Am self-taught and have a vast knowledge about the industry.

Would love to know more about you and your chocolate business. You can email me directly at choclinda@aol.com

Lekker bly,

Linda G.

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
05/25/11 02:21:21PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Well that's absolutely true Jeff, but you also have to employ people who have experience tempering, otherwise should something go wrong with a machine, they would most likely not be able to handle it.

Hand tempering is a crucial first step in understanding and working with chocolate. One of the first tasks I do with a new employee is teach them how to hand temper the easiest and cleanest way that does not require a slab and a mess.

Linda

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
05/25/11 02:14:53PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi: To reply to cheebs. Only the small table top Hilliards cooling/heating is done with light bulbs.

The larger machines use electric heating and cooling elements.

Being very mechanical I have been able to change elements when they wear out. This has only happened once in 20 years.

It also keeps it's temper perfectly throughout the day and chocolate can constantly be added to the back where it melts. As the bowl rotates, it is transfered to the front keeping a steady tempered quantity for production.

I would not be comfortable with a machine that has it's most crucial parts invisible.

Linda

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
05/25/11 02:06:28PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

When I first saw the Selmi many years ago, I didn't like the fact that you couldn't clean it. If something was accidentally dropped into the auger, how would you get it out?

Unless it has been changed, it would still be my concern. Hilliard is made in the USA. Customer service is stellar. Should a fuse need to be replaced it's simple. As mentioned above, I have had my machines for 18 years. All that needed to be replaced was a fuse. If you can change a light bulb, you can change a fuse.

The 250lb machines are set up for the addition of their conveyor from small to large.

Anyway, that's my two cents.

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
05/24/11 03:53:54PM
26 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

I would highly recommend Hilliard. I have two 250lb machines. One I purchased new in 1993. And the other was a used machine that I purchased a few years later.

They are reliable, accurate and easy to use.

Cleaning is a snap. All you have to do is remove the bowl.

They hold their temper unlike some of the smaller tabletop machines.

They are also relatively quiet, again unlike the smaller table top machines.

I have tested many machines over the years and I think that Hilliard is by far the best.

If you need to add a conveyor and cooling tunnel Hillard has those as well. They are located in Mass.

If I can provide anymore info, please reply.

Linda Grishman

sweetonvermont.com

Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
09/28/10 03:27:11PM
26 posts

Precoating Chocolate


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Lizzy: Never dip, just roll. And as you get more proficient at it, try rolling two together and then three. Just spread them out in our hand. The first roll doesn't necessarily even have to completely cover the ganache. That way it has some room to expand before the second roll. It's the only way I do it. Learned it years ago by accident. Just keep practicing and do your own thing.I think you'd enjoy my class as it's hands on. No more than two people. Otherwise it's a zoo and people have to strain to see what's going on.Keep up the good work and don't hesitate to ask questions.Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
09/26/10 09:39:55PM
26 posts

Precoating Chocolate


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You have it down pat..... you discovered the secret yourself. Twice dipped... no need to thin the chocolate and definitely not an additional coat over that. There's nothing worse than having to bite through a thick coating to get to the center.As you go along with that method, you will get faster and faster. However, make sure that you ganache balls are not too cold; that's what causes the cracking. In case you are concerned about this, just do one thin coat and let them stand for about 1/2 an hour. Then dip the second coat and they should be beautiful. You can tell the difference between mass produced and handmade.Good luck and if there's anything else I can do for you, don't hesitate to contact me.Linda Grishmanwww.sweetonvermont.com
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
11/09/09 04:01:32PM
26 posts

Best Female Chocolatier?


Posted in: Opinion

Try mine.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
11/03/09 06:30:38PM
26 posts

Best Female Chocolatier?


Posted in: Opinion

the reason why there are so few is because it's still a man's world. Guys help one another. Women either give up or let their husbands take over...... and they don't take women seriously either.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
11/03/09 06:29:33PM
26 posts

Best Female Chocolatier?


Posted in: Opinion

Linda Grishman of Sweet on Vermont Artisan Confections. Has been making hand made chocolates since 1984.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/26/09 05:11:47PM
26 posts

Online buying/selling?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi SU: Sorry to hear that your experiences in buying online from US chocolatier have not been happy. I couldn't agree with you more that although the chocs are beautiful online, they arrive tasting stale or even moldy. Not only that but the pictures are deceiving. The chocs are often minute and the weight of the box ordered isn't on the website either. I do a certain amount of purchasing online as I host chocolate tastings and we like to see what the others are doing. Some of those supposed great chocolatiers who purport to sell "freshly made" chocolates are misleading their customers. They were made fresh six months ago, but are sitting on shelves. One in particular and I wish I could mention his name, was so stale and inedible that I had to send them back. The person on the phone apologized saying "they probably forgot to rotate stock" and there you have it. We sell mostly wholesale and that's only our bars, maple brittle, chocolate covered maple brittle and caramels fleur de sel. The more delicate and short shelf life chocolates are sold retail via our website. We really do make everything fresh to order. Even if our customers have to wait a little longer, they know that what they will get is the best and the freshest. And we ship via the US Mail when our chocolates are going out west since it only takes 2-3 business days and UPS when shipping takes no more than 3 business days. We ship worldwide including Canada, South Africa, Australia, Hong Kong, Belgium, UK, Israel and even Antarctica. www.sweetonvermont.com Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/29/09 12:39:45PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Yes, I know. They are also lucky that their grandfather was born before them. (This was my late father's favorite expression, meaning that without their grandpa and daddy, where would they be). I bought a wrapping machine from Switzerland. The mistake I made was not to go to Switzerland to check them out. Machine cost me $30K and it never worked. "Beautiful looking" but never worked. It was a nightmare from hell. The manufacturer was a big weasel pig and joins the line of many more. Suffice it to say that I managed to find someone who said he could help. I am very mechanical, so we put my ideas into the process. Finally two years after it arrived, we had it to the point that it was ready to go. But I had to change the type of foil we were using. Then a battery that ran the computer died. No where in the specs was there mention of a battery. The program was lost. It defaulted back to another program. That was the end for me. I sent it off to Union... who said that they could get around $12K for it. Well, they got $5K and that was that. Didn't even give me a chance to refuse the amount, it had already been packed and shipped to the middle east. I was so tired of fighting at that point, that I just accepted it. It has been an uphill grind working with so many useless liars in this industry. I could write a book...but the stress of even thinking about it, makes me crazy. Did you try Jansen? Forget his first name. I will look it up for you. He's a really nice guy. Jeff why don't you call me to chat anyway. 802-862-5814. xxoo Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 10:27:41PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Yes a water jacketed one....both kettle and table brand new from Savage. You can get one right now from Union....I just got an email from them with a list of stuff and the one they have looks to be in great condition. Do you know Jim and John Greenberg?I want to taste some of your chocs....truffles and bon bons....send me some and I'll send you some of mine....although we won't begin making truffles until mid November for Thanksgiving. Lindaloo
updated by @Linda Grishman: 06/15/15 12:35:15PM
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 10:07:42PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Beth: Did you read my whole story that I posted yesterday about how I began making chocolate? Way before internet way before microwaves, way before the only chocolate Americans ate were Hershey (puke) bars.Here's how you start....JUST DO IT.......that was coined by a woman whose name I forget. She was a marketing genius back in the early '80s...then Nike took that slogan. So, don't worry about the small stuff...just do your thing. And don't worry about the size of your batches. Do you have a chocolate thermometer? If not get one. I have a bunch of machinery,but hand tempering is an art and if machines fail, you still have your two hands. 2 Hilliard 240lb tempering machines, Savage Bros. cooker with cooling table, Doboy flow wrapper and a host of other toys that I made myself. I love tinkering.. If you need more info and support, you can email me directly to talk or call me....email choclinda@aol.com phone 802-862-5814 or in the eve my home phone is 802-862-3412. Hang in there. Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 08:02:46PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

I might have to take a trip to Oregon. I too have an aching back; my shoulders are killing me, my neck is out of wack and so is my brain. I am sure that Vermont will pass that law one of these days as well as the AS. My memory is totally fucked....runs in the family...so there I go down lala land. Anyone interested in buying a great little chocolate company in Burlington Vermont? No kidding. sweetonvermont.com
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 07:58:34PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

I ordered a box of sponge candy from very well known company in Buffalo NY -- supposed to be the home of sponge candy. Well, it was bloody awful and I mean AWFUL. The texture was good, but it was flavorless and left a bitter aftertaste. On top of that it came in a lovely box, but once opened what a shock. Two sealed plastic (not cello) bags of the sponge candy, some cracked, crumbs of chocolate; How unappealing; and the chocolate was really gross. So, that's my two cents and I feel kinda ripped off. We tossed it in the garbage.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 07:52:01PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Beth: Glad you enjoyed Vermont in the 70's. Obviously it has changed a lot, but still retains it's beauty. Luckily for our ACT 250 which does not allow construction that would interfere with our overall way of life. No strip malls, no big ugly signs on our highways. All commercial buildings have to conform to strict codes.As for a class, you'll just have to come back east. Did you read my postings above? I give hands on classes...no more than 2 people. You can check out my website or you can call me. The number is on the site. Linda www.sweetonvermont.com
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 01:34:46PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Yeah! I do fuck with a lot of stuff. I think I have it down, but it's so unpredictable. The first batch was the best and then it was 4 or 5 batches into the garbage. Finally I got another good batch. Everything has to be tweaked, but that's what I love about this business.Well my friend, you have to at least come and visit Vermont. This was where the first hippies came and settled. This is also the most progressive state. I think what I like is the Yankeeness. Unpretentious people, nothing artificial. No frightening looking humans with their plastic surgery aberrations. Seeing that on TV really makes me feel creepy. We are a small state that has retained it's bucolic feel. You can drive 10 minutes and be in the country side. So, there you have it. Don't go further west, it just gets weirder.I would like to be in Cape Town when the oceans really begin to rise. It's the most beautiful city in the world.... Even now when I look at photos I took when I was there in 1999, I notice one beach in particular that had a gorgeous rock formation is now out in the middle of the ocean. That's really alarming.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/28/09 12:57:52AM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Vermont is gorgeous. Yeah! of course we have a herd of feral hippies and aging formerly raging feminists like moi. Phish heads too? Even though I think some rotted away when Phish disbanded.Pack up your business and move to Vermont. We could have a blast. I'm off the wall and so are you. Interesting about your cheese truffles. I made some in 1996 and people thought I had gone completely out of my mind. What am I an anachronism? So come visit.
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/27/09 05:20:22PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Carol: Thank you for the compliment. When and where did you have them?
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/27/09 02:18:27PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Well, I can teach you how to make artistic chocolate. However, my belief is that the eating experience is far more important. Truffles for instance got their name from the fungus. Therefore, square pieces with decorative transfer sheets are not truffles. They are squares filled with ganache. The ratio of ganache to the shell is small. You need to be able to sink your teeth into a truffle and get the full experience of savoring texture and taste. The texture of the ganache is important. Not runny or gooey and not hard either. Craig wrote about me on seriouseats.com after he visited Vermont last year. You can see what he said about my truffles.So Jeff, when are you coming to visit me in Vermont. I think we would have a lot of fun and laughter together.Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/27/09 02:06:26PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

Well Jeff, at least you don't fit the stereotype of stuck-up, aren't I just wonderful chocolatier.Here's my story. Born and raised in Johannesburg. Came to the USA in 1976. Tasted a Hershey bar and spat it out. My Mom was a chocolate lover way back when. So I grew up eating good sweets and chocolates...imported and local.I "fell into" chocolate in 1984, when a friend of a friend had recently married. His Mom(in Wisconsin) made some sort of confection with peanut butter. So he wanted to sell them in Manhattan. It was perfect timing as the gourmet food shops were beginning to sprout up everywhere. However, he wasn't into sales. So I did. At that time he was a struggling actor. His part time job was driving Peggy Lee to her nightly Broadway show. He had her limo and would drive me to drop off the orders. For those of you too young to know about Peggy Lee; she was a famous jazz singer.Anyway, to continue. I started building orders and he didn't want to "sit at home making chocolate." So we split the few hundred bucks we had and I went on my journey. I began to dabble with truffle. There was no internet in those days AND there were no microwaves either (I feel like a relic). So I took myself off to the New York City Library. All I could find was Candy Industry, but it was a gold mine. I taught myself how to temper chocolate and since I have always had an inquiring mind and have never been afraid to tackle anything, I was on my way. Schlepping my big brown bags of boxes of truffles on the subway to stores, and hotels. I was in my early 30's and had lots of enthusiasm and energy. Most people didn't know what a truffle was back then. Then I moved to Vermont in 1991. I got reviews in many publications including the New York Times, Business Week and more. However, I had no desire to open a shop. I have a lot of freedom that way. Besides I couldn't stand to watch stuff get stale as it does when sitting in counters or in boxes. Most of my business is wholesale and the rest comes from my website. When I say it's freshly made, you can be assured it's freshly made within a week of shipping. I have conducted many taste tests and I find that just about all of them are lousy. Stale and tasteless or stale and tasting like cheap perfume. The industry is filled with big egos whose prices are through the roof, but the quality and freshness is under par n my opinion. I was most definitely the first (1996)to come out with a range of chocolate bars; my Mooonlight in Vermont in 8 varieties. The packaging is unique and whimsical. And I think that 13 years and still growing, it has stood the test of time. Everything is made by hand. The almond bars have whole almonds which cannot be done by machine, that's why you get crushed almonds in all other bars.I am glad to hear that Jeff is a down to earth "character" like myself. My next endeavor is to play around with bean to bar. For relaxation I am a lampworker. I make glass beads. Only in the winter, since it would be unbearable to sit at a torch that's around a gazillion degrees, beside a kiln that's around 1000F. I am also a poet and writer and am working on my memoir of growing up in South Africa So there you have my story. Come visit, come take a class with me. Linda
Linda Grishman
@Linda Grishman
10/26/09 04:42:23PM
26 posts

Best chocolate school


Posted in: Opinion

I have a chocolate school here in beautiful Burlington Vermont. No more than 2 people at a time. Why only 2; because I prefer to give a hands-on personal class. In other schools, students spend a lot of time watching demos and getting very little hands on experience. Not only that, but they have to crowd around the table craning their necks to see what the instructor is doing. That also means that many students don't want to ask questions fearing that they may look foolish. I have had a number of students who have already taken classes with the big culinary/chocolate institutions, only to come away with very little knowledge and frustration. Many of my students have gone on to open their own successful chocolate shops.Since I do not pad my classes with a lot of superfluous information, beginner and advanced classes run two days. Yes, I said two days. Not only do my students get hands on experience, but we also have a lot of fun. After the classes are over I am then always available online for questions. My students come from all over the country and also get to enjoy beautiful Vermont.Students are given resources so that they have all the tools and contacts they will need. sweetonvermont.com