Forum Activity for @Stu Jordan

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
06/18/14 12:18:22AM
37 posts

Difficulty in dislodging Chocolate from Mould


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Or 5. Your chocolate was not tempered correctly

And you need to tap the mold onto a surface, hitting it from above won't really work - what you describe in 3 could be part of the problem.

How long are you leaving your chocolate to retract after casting the shells? What are you doing with the fridge? Try putting shells in fridge after you have made them for 12 minutes, that may get your retraction process started, then fill them and leave them before sealing.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
09/11/12 06:22:49PM
37 posts

Does anyone know good chocolate sprayers?


Posted in: Classifieds

The key is to use 50% chocolate & 50% cocoa butter when spraying. Trying to spray chocolate by itself is pretty challenging. Then anything above 50PSI should do the job, just be careful if using a compressor, that the oil used in the machine can't contaminate the air (many industrial units have this issue).

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
10/04/12 08:11:12PM
37 posts

BRIGHTNESS ON CHOCOLATE


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

When you get the shine right, it can be spectacular, but takes a lot of practice and some extra techniques to get it super shiny - I have attached one of ours to show the shine we achieve. No glaze, nothing added, just manipulating the coca butter pretty much in the manner laid out here (a couple of other things as well but nothing overly substantial)

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
04/18/12 10:43:28PM
37 posts

BRIGHTNESS ON CHOCOLATE


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Yes, all you need is well tempered couverture and as someone has already pointed out, you should first 'skim' the mold with a layer of tempered chocolate or coca butter spray before making your shells. Most chocolatiers don't do this because it adds time to the process, but that is essentially how you get the shine - we use our fingers to apply the very thin coat when not spraying, as it helps avoid over-crystallization of the chocolate (when it gets too much movement) which is easy to do with a brush.

all the best making chocolate,

- Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
04/18/12 09:35:53PM
37 posts

"We Eat With Our Eyes." Hmmmm.... I'm not convinced.


Posted in: Opinion

Interesting discussion Brad,

I think both are important. I like chocolate that engages multiple senses. That said, taste is the most important to me. But I have trialled chocolates that are identical in flavor profile (same ganache) but presented differently, and one totally outsold the other. So I think as consumers, people eat with their eyes first. If you can back that up with great taste, then you have a winning combination.

Assuming that your customers build trust, and are happy to buy on taste I still think well presented chocolates should not be over-looked. Despite the fact they will be more likely to buy because they like your product, you still want to entice new customers to keep your business growing - and I think if you can engage the eyes AND the mouth in terms of impressing people, this is better than just focusing on taste and not worrying too much about the final look. So I believe the more senses we engage well, the better.

That's my two cents worth, and only because that is what seems to work best for me

- Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
03/31/12 04:46:31AM
37 posts

Adding flavor to tablets


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hello,

Just curious if anyone has a good idea for tips on flavoring tablets/bars. I am experimenting with freeze dried powders, and that works OK.

Also keen to find out some methods for making the batches for molding - using a bowl, the chocolate gets too cool too quickly - looking to be able to make around 20 molds at a time (so about 100 bars) and I am not sure I want to use a melting tank full of flavored chocolate...any other method I haven't thought of?

Cheers, Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/10/15 08:45:55PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
04/18/12 09:07:52PM
37 posts

Advice from Mol D'art


Posted in: Uncategorized

Update 2: Well, the melting tank arrived back 3 days ago, and I noticed that I could not keep chocolate in a good crystallized state. It appeared to be getting too warm - and sure enough, ten minutes after getting the chocolate pre-crystallized, it goes out of temper and very liquid.

So it appears it has a faulty thermostat now. UG! My other Mol D'art 12l is fine, i have no issues with that one, but with this one: I guess once a lemon, always a lemon. I let the milk chocolate in it cool down after switching it off, stirring - took about an hour - and got it back to tempered state (lovely shiny test and all), checked with thermometer which showed 29.8 degrees C, and what did the thermostat say? It clicked on and off at around 18 degrees...so looks like this one is going BACK to Mol D'art. And this is a brand new machine, twice faulty now.

I am also cancelling my order for 2 x 6l Mol D'art melting kettles, as I have totally lost faith in this brand, so if anyone knows a good RELIABLE brand of melting kettle that would be available in 230v (New Zealand), please let me know.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
03/20/12 03:35:23AM
37 posts

Advice from Mol D'art


Posted in: Uncategorized

Update - well, they are now offering to take the unit back and have even given me their UPS details so I don't have to pay the shipping. While I will be down a melter for a while, this is a pretty good change of heart from them.

- Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
03/19/12 05:38:22PM
37 posts

Advice from Mol D'art


Posted in: Uncategorized

I purchased a 12l melting kettle through Chocolate World, it is a Mol D'art model. I am in New Zealand which is about as far away from Belgium as you can get.

It failed after one week and it is not the thermostat, the unit is not getting any power.

The advice from Mol D'art through Chocolate World is that it is possibly something wrong with the wiring and suggested I open the melting kettle up by unscrewing all the screws and check the wiring.

Not being an electrician, or having the faintest idea about wiring, this seems pretty strange advice - and extremely unsafe! Has anyone else experienced issues with warranties on Mol D'art products? Have I just bought a lemon?

- Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/12/15 03:17:05PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
12/25/11 08:25:57PM
37 posts

What is the best flooring for a Chocolate Factory?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

We are in the process of converting an industrial building into a chocolate factory. Flooring in NZ for food premises is fairly strict. I have been considering an epoxy resin to go over the concrete floor. Still waiting on quotes for vinyl to compare but epoxy resin would be suitable for us regardless.Let us know what you decideStu
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
11/28/11 09:23:31PM
37 posts

Advice? Buying a Tempering Machine or Two


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Clay,

Hourly throughput in the range of 50 - 90kg

Cheers

Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
11/28/11 04:29:48PM
37 posts

Advice? Buying a Tempering Machine or Two


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Clay

Good point, have edited my post above to include the relevant information, which is:

Continuous Automatic (would be nice!) or semi-automatic wheel machine (most likely what I can afford). I do not want a manual melter.

Size - 25kg capacity is about right for us.

Thanks

Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
11/27/11 08:35:17PM
37 posts

Advice? Buying a Tempering Machine or Two


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hello!

It is finally that time - we have found a 300sqm site for our new factory/offices/cafe/showroom.

Next step - buy tempering machines. And getting them to New Zealand (for those geographically challenged, that's next to Australia. If you don't know where Australia is, you are probably a little too geographically challenged ;)

I am so torn about what to buy. I want to have two machines, so I do not need to change out to mix between milk & dark. And to keep production in the event one needs servicing. But by buying 2, I will not be able to afford a Selmi.

I have considered 2 x Moldart machines as these are fairly reasonable in price.

I have heard a lot of people talk about Prefect machines, but haven't priced/examined in detail, but this could be an option.

Essentially, I don't want to spend more than $15,000 US - what would you do with that budget? I am looking for either continuous automatic tempering or a semi-automatic wheel machine. Must have vibrating table. Size - 25kg capacity would be the ideal size.

Lastly, anyone used Desserthouse? They are offering 40% off but I have never heard of them.

Thanks

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/10/15 07:13:57PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
11/04/11 12:28:24AM
37 posts

new manufacturing - what mistakes should we avoid?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hello from NZ,

We are in the process of moving into manufacturing our own product - up until now we have been a retailer of other peoples products. We will slowly phase in our own products as we gain proficiency.

I am yet to decide on a tempering machine. I am going to spend quite a bit on a powerful air conditioner/dehumidifier to control the atmosphere in our little factory.

At this stage, we will only be chocolate melters - but eventually will develop more into bean - bar chocolate. One step at a time!

What are the main mistakes others have made when setting up their manufacturing? What issues should we be aware of before starting out?

Thanks so much in advance for your advice

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/10/15 09:43:33PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
10/26/11 09:47:31PM
37 posts

Savour Chocolate School in Melbourne


Posted in: Opinion

Hanna, I am pleased to hear your feedback! If I do come over, I will have to come and catch up! It is been a while since you left NZ now!
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
10/18/11 04:09:00PM
37 posts

Savour Chocolate School in Melbourne


Posted in: Opinion

I am contemplating a visit to Savour in January to do 17 days of training.

Has anyone been to this school? If so, did you find the experience worthwhile? Knowing what you know now, would you have approached the courses in a different way? And lastly, how did you find the course material that you took away afterward?

Thanks!

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/10/15 04:42:24PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
11/04/11 12:09:31AM
37 posts

Questions for the Retail shop owner


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Elaine,

We have been in business for just over 2 years. We have conducted market research by sending a survey to 2000 random members of our database. We found the following:

  • 57% of people came in to buy products for themselves
  • 38% of people came in to buy gifts for others.

From this, we have ensured we have increased our range of 'treat yourself' products and consolidated our gift offering - and as a result, our sales have increased. So in terms of what type of products we sell... we have 120 different flavor praline & truffles in our cabinets (some say this is too much, but we ditch poor performers and we move thousands of chocolates from these cabinets every week). We sell a number of different 'treat yourself' products from slabs, tablets/bars, through to confectionery & fudge bags, Coconut Ice, a range of chocolate coated peanuts, almonds, raisins, ginger, etc etc etc. In the gift range we have sourced unique packaging (we have an aversion to cheap packaging which seems prolific in our industry). We then box up different chocolate selections for each packaging type.

Why would I add a cafe/seating? 54% of our database said they would like it if we added seating. We do sell takeaway coffee, but if we had seating, we would sell a lot more coffee etc. That said, it would also detract from our retail focus, so we just sit in our niche and leave the cafes to others for now. The other issue with a cafe is where to draw the line...muffins..sandwiches...when does the line get crossed where you become more cafe and less chocolate shop? We do not sell baked goods.

We are purely a retailer selling chocolate made by various chocolatiers - but our next move is into manufacturing our own product as well - we figure there is serious margin in this end of the market.

Hope that helps answer your questions, and I hope planning is going well for you.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
10/26/11 10:07:23PM
37 posts

Questions for the Retail shop owner


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Elaine,

You pose some interesting questions. I won't be able to answer all of them here, but happy to share a bit of my experience starting a chocolate retail business (and studying others). I am a retailer first and foremost, and chose chocolate because..well...I love chocolate and there was an open market here.

The most critical aspect of a chocolate retail outlet is LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION. People believe they can open in the back streets and people will come because it is a chocolate shop. Not so. Most chocolate purchases are impulsive. Opening on the back streets means you will spend a LOT of time and resource marketing and building yur brand awareness. Don't be afraid of higher rents - they tend to deliver a higher level of foot traffic - and if you are where the people are, they will shop with you, letting you focus on selling and making chocolate (and not spend half your life stressing over how to get more people into your shop).

We did not start out making our own product - and only recently made the decision to go down that road. If you are a manufacturer as well, you should have plenty of margin in your product to support a decent retail business, so long as you get the location, fit out, and pricing right.

The main thing I would do differently is to offer seating in our stores.

The last piece of advice I can give is to read a book called "The E-myth" - it will help ensure you fully understand the difference between making chocolate and running a retail business. All the best.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
02/24/12 06:36:06PM
37 posts

Has anyone used "chocolate factory in a box"


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

HI Omar

I have one Matfer 15kg (it has the wheel and can temper but I use it manually), and then 2 x 12l from Chocolate World - link to image here: http://www.chocolateworld.be/fotos/M1008.jpg

- Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
02/24/12 12:05:28AM
37 posts

Has anyone used "chocolate factory in a box"


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Clay, that was good advice and I decided against the chocolate world factory in a box concept. Before I made any decision, I went and got some very good chocolate training (they had competed in the World Chocolate Masters) - it was this that gave me an understanding of the direction I wanted to go, and the equipment I would need. The factory in a box option, as you pointed out, was expensive and didn't have everything I would need, and some things it turns out I don't need.

Nearly 5 months after my initial post above, and the decision has been made. I took a 300sqm warehouse and converted it into offices, retail outlet/cafe store, and a large factory.

I have decided against a tempering machine, instead investing in 1 x 15kg and 2 x 12kg melting tanks. I enjoy hand tempering/crystallizing the chocolate, so a tempering machine was ditched from the shopping list.

My new factory/production facility is geared toward artisan chocolate, and should be operational in about 8 more days all going to plan. Ended up spending WAY to much, but have gone with:

* 2 x custom built stainless benches with granite bench tops (and tray racks underneath)

* A custom built spray booth for both artisan chocolate and sculptures (plus a gravity air gun + compressor)

* Heated cabinet for cocoa butter/color

* A commercial oven so I can roast my own nuts etc and make my own praline (copper bowl method) - and I will be doing Macarons too, based on some very good advice I received

* A guitar cutter (Matfer) - decided this was a necessity in the end

* Over 200 poly carbonite molds (20 - 30 of each style)

* A massive air conditioning unit that can keep the factory at 18 degrees C and 50% Relative humidity.

And on top of this is all the shelving, stainless packing benches, miscellaneous tools (spatulas, spoons, bowls, pots, etc), refrigeration (who knew commercial refrigeration cabinets were so expensive!), pantries, etc.

Many of the comments on the forums here made the point that it isn't about the equipment, it is about knowing how to use the equipment (eg, the equipment does not make a chocolatier, and having a Selmi won't be any use to you if you don't understand the pre-crystallization of chocolate). This is so true! When I need to scale up some more, I may get a Selmi, but until then, I will be more than content using my melting tanks.

- Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
10/03/11 09:01:35PM
37 posts

Has anyone used "chocolate factory in a box"


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

A Belgium company (chocolateworld.be) sells a 'chocolate factory in a box' concept.

We are starting out in making chocolate (not from bean yet, but one day!) and this concept looks pretty interesting.

Has anyone here used this, or any of this company's products before? Any feedback?

Thanks

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/09/15 06:24:16AM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/25/11 02:37:16AM
37 posts

Tales from Chocolate Mecca: Oaxaca


Posted in: Travels & Adventures

What a great post. Makes me want to go off & explore the world of Cocao!
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/25/11 02:34:01AM
37 posts

Chocolate Rice


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Nat,

Sounds like you are having a good time in Thailand!

Hadn't thought of pushing through a large sieve, that could work if we hang the sieve up high & leave the strands hanging until they have solidified. Then take off and cut to size.

As you say, the other option is to get a mold made from actual rice, which is probably the best option long term.

Stu
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/20/11 01:05:53AM
37 posts

Chocolate Rice


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hello!

Strange query here - does anyone know a good way to make white chocolate that looks like rice? I cannot find a 'rice mold' anywhere so wondered if anyone had made this before and if so - how?

Thanks!

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/12/15 04:51:19AM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/25/11 02:28:08AM
37 posts

Which Inventory Software & POS System to Use


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Andy

I agree that 'registers' are outdated and don't really deliver on functionality. We use a customised software solution and run it on a good looking touch screen PC (with mini keyboard of course), and have integrated Eftpos/Credit card + printers (barcode label printer & receipt printer), which is transitioning to the cloud as we now run multiple sites. The most important factors for me in my system are:

* business intelligence - ability to see as much data as possible to track and analyze products (individual, category, or by attribute, over any period I want)

* simple, intuitive Point of Sale interface for FAST and simple processing of sales (we have put through over 700 sales in a day before). Our barcode system allows fast sanning of retail shelf products and our short number codes for our loose assorted cabinet chocolates are fast and easy to type in (we have over 120 individual flavors etc). All up we have over 600 SKUS on our system, although only 400 or so are active.

* CRM (Customer Relationship Management) we have included a bar coded loyalty card system which gives points on all purchases to customers and allows us to market to customers who buy particular items etc

There are plenty of other nice to have functionality, but if I could only have three, they would be it.

There are most certainly great opportunities in the cloud now, and I am very excited about our upcoming transition as our software moves off our PCs and into the cloud, giving me more control from our head office while still allowing stores a decent level of autonomy for daily things.

I also spent a long time looking, and there were so many bad systems, I feel lucky to have found the one I did. Thanks for your comments, made me realize I had not really elaborated on my system.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/20/11 01:08:44AM
37 posts

Which Inventory Software & POS System to Use


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Emay,

I started down that path just over two years ago here in New Zealand and it has been a lot of fun! We use a POS system that was customized for us, and is made for New Zealand, so would not work over there. Just make sure you get a good, reliable system that makes it easy to track which flavors you are selling - if you just lump all your loose chocolates into one 'code' you will make forecasting and planning that much harder.

Good luck!!

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
07/08/11 09:24:14PM
37 posts

Mobile Apps for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android


Posted in: Self Promotion / Spam

We will be launching our app very soon, it is certainly a growth area and gets the next generation interacting with your brand. A good app takes a lot of development though, ours is 4 months already, and about another 2 to go - we have the basics done, I have even run through it on the test phase, and once it is done, I will post the details here so people can download it and have a play!
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
06/08/11 03:32:17AM
37 posts

Cemoi


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Folks,

A few quick questions about Cemoi couverture,

  1. What is it like to work with?
  2. How does it stack up compared to other couvertures on the market?
  3. Would you recommend this brand?

Thanks,
Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/19/15 07:20:24PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
03/02/11 01:55:39AM
37 posts

Chocolate Accessories - where to buy?


Posted in: Classifieds

Hi,

I am looking to equip a new chocolate factory.

Apart from tempering equipment etc, can anyone recommend a good online site for buying the accessories, like truffle spoons, etc.

Thanks in advance,

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 06/07/15 03:02:34PM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
03/02/11 01:41:37AM
37 posts

Agave


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Jessica,

We recently started ranging a RAW chocolate product. The company is not bean to bar, but uses raw product they buy in, re-combine (I think) and then use Agave nectar as a sweetener. This means the chocolate is sugar free (apart from natural occurring sugars which is about 2.5%), vegan, gluten free, etc. It has been surprisingly popular, especially given it is quite a high price in comparison.

Interestingly, they do not use an emulsifier either, so it is chunky/grainy/gritty. Surprisingly, I thought the chocolate was rather intense in flavor (its 74% I think) and not too bad! I have no opinion on the benefits of raw, and am not sure about their claims that it contains 4x the anti-oxidants of other chocolate, but if customers want it, we will sell it (so long as it meets our criteria, which this does)

You can find the company here: http://www.naturesgold.co.nz/index.html

Cheers

Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
02/06/11 06:32:01PM
37 posts

Truffle trees


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi

Here is an example of the old "cone ball and toothpick" - this is from House of Chocolate in New Zealand.

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
01/28/11 05:29:27AM
37 posts

Marketing Ideas


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Brad

I really appreciate the time & effort you put into this reply.

I am most excited about the advice around 'creating a buzz' - at wholesale, the cost of various ways of creating that buzz is not really that expensive, and is something I should be doing more of. We tried a free chocolate giveaway last year and emailed our database: 2 hours only (unless we ran out first). People were surprised by how much we gave each person, and we did run out after 1.5 hours. And the great thing was, not only did we have a queue snaking for miles (people are still talking about it), we also had our best trading day that month - more than enough to pay for the free product.

I think having read your post, I will really focus on ways to create that buzz, as I have had terrible responses from traditional forms of media and can't see me going back down that road.

Your comments on the free tastings is very thought provoking, and I think have a lot of merit, so I will give this some serious consideration.

I also like the idea of education - if you are sold out two months in advance, that is quite amazing. And it is something that would be easy to implement. I will start working on the best way to get this up and running ASAP.

To get advice like this on a free forum is really exceptional, I hope one day I can make it to Canada and come see your operation and talk chocolate.

Thank you!

Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
01/27/11 08:42:08PM
37 posts

Marketing Ideas


Posted in: Opinion

Hi Folks,

I am in the process of developing a marketing plan for my chocolate shop business, especially as we open new stores. I am interested in any ideas/methods/events people here have used or seen used in the chocolate industry to create a buzz, connect with the community, and grow revenue.

I am happy to reciprocate with a few of our own marketing tools:

- We operate a loyalty club which is growing fast - one point = $1.00, and after 200 points, customer gets $10 voucher. We also have exclusive deals for our loyalty card holders. This is all run through the CRM module in our POS system.

- We offer free tastings to every customer (as do most chocolate shops!)

- We run regular promotions, and have a tasting station set up outside our store most Fridays to tie in with the relevant promotion

- We market on Facebook (ads, fanpage), tourist magazines, but not much other advertising

Any ideas you have will be gratefully accepted. Happy for these to be sent to me privately.

Happy trading,

Stu


updated by @Stu Jordan: 04/12/15 05:16:52AM
Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
01/25/11 02:01:18AM
37 posts

Co-manufacturing


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi Elaine,

It is known as 'private labeling' - essentially, you make the product which they will sell as their own brand. It is a very common method of production, you would be surprised how many products are sold under one label but made by another.

The best advice I can give you is to ensure you lock them in and do not give them the recipe. The reason they will private label is that they either do not have the resource (people/equipment) or the skill to do it themselves, and if it is your specialty, then they figure it will be cheaper in the long run for them to buy from you.

If you already wholesale, it is just the same - except they may provide you with packaging to use as well. Just ensure they do not have 'made by <their name>' on the label, but maybe 'made for <their name>' instead. But don't expect to get your brand on there.

Some people do not like to private label for others, I think it is a terrific way to increase your revenue.

One of my brands on the shelves in my store is private labeled, I get the product, made to my recipe, delivered in bulk and we repackage.

Hope this helps

Stu

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
01/24/11 07:11:17PM
37 posts

Chocolate Drinking Machine Recommendations


Posted in: Geek Gear - Cool Tools

Hi Andy,

I just picked up on this thread. I use the same machine as advertised on Sarahs Sweet Shop, but found these are available far cheaper if you shop around. I have 2 of them. Many just melt chocolate in this, but we have developed a hot chocolate that has people queing in the winter, and keeps both machines busy. How we do it is simple - if you only make a half mix (half fill it), it will heat up to around 60 degrees in about 15-20 minutes - my staff put it on as soon as they arrive. In the 2nd machine, they put a full mix, which can take a lot lot longer - not twice as long but almost 3x as long. However, by the time the 1st machine is empty, the 2nd is ready, and we simply refill the first machine so its ready when the other machine then runs out.

We make the mix up from cold, but add a lot of chocolate to it and heat it up to 90, then bring it back down to 60C, it means it thickens a bit better and doesn't require artificial thickening. We leave it churning away happily - it is fine for the day, but we do not keep it from day to day, we make it fresh each day. I can't give you the recipe, but it is easily our best known product, and our top grossing revenue product in the store - which is a boutique chocolate shop. We also only do it in takeaway, as we have no seating. We also make this up from cold, and it has a milk base. There is nothing better on the market I have found, and these two machines paid for themselves 100x over in the first year.

We use a 5l machine, and I picked up one of them for around $400US. New. So shop around.

Hope this bealted first hand example helps!

Stu Jordan
@Stu Jordan
05/04/12 06:33:41PM
37 posts

Mol d'Art


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

N early four years after the first post in this thread, I find I too had a similar issue with Mol D'art - purchased 2 x 12kg machines, the first one died after 1 day, and they suggested I just open it and look at the wiring...it was sent back for repair in the end, which took around 2 - 3 weeks.

Just after it arrived back, my 2nd machine also died - they said so unusual for two to fail it must be power surges or something wrong with my power supply. My electrician took a look inside, said it had been re-wired, the thermostat was 'average' and had failed, and this failure could not have been a result of the power surge. He tested my factory and said I had stable power, and some thing wired into the Distribution Board absorbed/prevented power surges.

When the machines are going, they are good to work with, but my electrician could not believe what I paid for these given they were so cheap inside. I think I am just unlucky to have 2 failures...none of my other melters (Matfer) have had issue, nor has any of my other equipment, some very specialised.

I just cancelled a further order of 2 x 6kg from Mol D'art, as they were not very helpful. So I have a different brand melter coming, and will hope it goes a little better than the Mol D'arts, which I am not sure I would buy again.