Forum Activity for @Jeff Stern

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
10/01/13 06:35:15PM
78 posts

INVERTASE Please Share Some Wisdom!


Posted in: Tasting Notes

Invertase will soften a fondant center but may not necessarily prevent crystallization or give the same result in a ganache. While cooking, you may want to add a tablespoon of glucose-or any amount in small enough proportion to your recipe that it will not change the consistency much. Glucose can help prevent crystallization. Hope this helps.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
10/01/13 06:39:34PM
78 posts

Slightly out of my depth! :-0


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

A gum arabic solution is often used to seal items such as dried fruits and nuts for panning because it stops fat and moisture migration and enhances shelf life. My guess is a similar process could be used on inclusions by spraying the proper solution with a compressor onto inclusions in a panning drum, letting the solution set on items, then dropping them into your bars/bark/whatever.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
04/14/13 07:17:41PM
78 posts

Crystallization of Caramels


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

If you reduce fat, you will increase the stickiness of the final product. If you decrease corn syrup or glucose the flow properties will change. Less glucose/corn syrup, less flow in the final product. The reverse is also true, more fat, less stickiness, easier to bit. More glucose, more flow. Play with these only in small percentages (like 2-4% adjustments at most). Make sure all your sugar is fully melted. Add glucose/corn syrup only after you have dissolved all sugars.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/21/13 09:26:41PM
78 posts

Advice on Chef Rubber Air Compressors


Posted in: Opinion

Buy an Iawata, they rock. Don't get too wimpy of a compressor. The 1/3 horsepower over the 1/5, especially if you can adjust the pressure-crucial. Make sure it has a pressure chamber to hold air in reserve, keeps your flow even. Two hoses is great, especially if you can adjust the pressure of each one independently.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
11/22/12 01:04:55PM
78 posts

nutrition labeling for a box of assorted chocolates


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Your are permitted to have a label that reflects a composite value of the products inside for a mixed box. You can check out the guidelines here

http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/FoodLabelingNutrition/FoodLabelingGuide/default.htm

Remember, these are not law but regulations, but it's best to try and follow as closely as possible.

Here's the key paragraph

Products with Separately Packaged Ingredients/Assortments of Foods/Gift Packages (21 CFR 101.9(h))

P1. Can the Nutrition Facts label on a box containing dry noodles and a seasoning packet list the nutrients in the noodles separately from the seasoning packet? If so, must a column be included that gives the total nutrients for the noodles and the seasoning packet?

Answer:Section 101.9(h)(1) provides the option of listing nutrition information per serving for each component or as a composite value. The decision is up to the manufacturer. A column of total values is not required.

P2. What are the labeling options for products packed in an assortment that are intended to be eaten at the same time? Can the nutrient analysis for a product containing a mixture of nuts or different types of dried fruit be based on a composite of the mixture blended together?

Answer:Section 101.9(h)(1) allows the nutrition information for assortments of the same type of food (e.g., mixed nuts or mixed fruits) that are intended to be consumed at the same time to be specified for each component or as a composite value. Therefore, if it is reasonable to assume that a consumer would eat an assortment of the nuts or fruits offered, a single composite analysis may be used to determine the nutrient composition.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
03/11/12 07:06:11AM
78 posts

Need to know about parts/manual availability for this machine.


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You're missing a piece that should fit onto the rod, where the wheel then fits into a groove in the piece, allowing the chocolate to be brought up into the piece which has a spout opening for filling molds.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
02/02/12 10:37:44AM
78 posts

Hershey - How Responsible is Responsible?


Posted in: Opinion

Thanks for this piece, Clay. Your doubts are highly valid ones-and they closely parallel most of the issues with many aid programs, whether they support the cocoa sector or other sectors, especially the ones funded by the US government. Most USAID funds, for example, end up going to administrative costs, highly paid consultants, per diems, air fares, etc. with usually at least 50%, if not a much higher percentage, never actually being spent in the country on the people where the aid is supposedly destined for. Most of the money ends up being spent back in the US. And just like this program, many aid programs have a 5 year or 3 year time horizon, hardly enough to make any kind of lasting impact. Maintaining sustained funding is often difficult if not impossible because ofpolitical changes, changes in the Administration, changes in the political winds, etc.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/27/12 12:29:31PM
78 posts

Too Dry for Tempering?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Humidity shouldn't really affect your tempering process. I work at 10,000 feet here in Quito with probably 40% or lower humidity much of the time and never had an issue.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/23/12 11:41:37AM
78 posts

Problems using Confectionary Guitar


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You let it sit until dry. The reason to use untempered chocolate is in part because it will be softer and less brittle on cutting, but also because as you are spreading the chocolate and moving it around, you are helping crystallize it as it cools. So it won't be completely untempered or improperly crystallized when cutting.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/22/12 12:48:24PM
78 posts

Problems using Confectionary Guitar


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

It sounds like your ganache slabs are too hard and there are two possible causes; either the formulas are off making the ganache too hard when set, or your slabs (and perhaps ambient temperature) are too low, or a combination of the two. Ideally, you should be able to cut your slabs with no breakage or crumbling if your formulas are right-that being said, the slabs should be at room temperature, which should ideally be around 62-68F. The wires should go right through the ganache easily. But the ganache should be firm enough that you can pick it up with your fingers without damaging the edges. You'll know when it's right-wires cut easily, edges are clean with no crumbs/breakage, and you can still manage to pick up the cut pieces fairly easily without the edges being so soft that they squish from the slightest pressure from your fingers.

Chocolate foot should be down when cutting and very thin. I prefer to put the foot onto the silpat or sheet I'm laying my ganache down on first, then pour the ganache on top. Alternatively, you can let the ganache set, then add a thin layer with a spatula-but you get a flatter bottom if you lay down the thin layer first, then pour the ganache on top.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/10/12 06:56:58PM
78 posts

When a Guide to Good May Not Be


Posted in: Opinion

Thanks for the astute analysis Clay. One of the main points you make is all about marketing-the big guys have the money and voice to shout, shout, shout about how great their products, certs. etc. are, and if you say something enough times unfortunately it often becomes "truth" even though it may not be. It's going to be a long slog but for those of us who are the "little guys" with direct connections to farmers, producers, and small scale chocolatiers, we know it's the only way to go. Direct connections/relationships are the key.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
12/18/11 09:33:15AM
78 posts

What's your dream machine?


Posted in: Opinion

I own a Prefamac 30 kg wheel machine with enrober, detailer and blower. Takes some practice to operate but am quite happy with the results I get. Sure, you do get more bells and whistles with a more expensive machine with automatic tempering, but you are going to pay $10k to $15k more. I don't have any issues with keeping the chocolate in temper as Daniel mentions; as long as you know how to work with chocolate it's pretty easy to keep temper all day. With two people operating the machine, I can do 800-1,000 pieces an hour. With the ceramic heat lamps that can be placed close to the chocolate, there is no or very little buildup on the belt or elsewhere even with the blower running.You can read more of my responses on this forum..http://www.thechocolatelife.com/forum/topics/if-selmi-is-the-cadala...

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
09/22/11 05:33:20PM
78 posts

kitchen aide panning machine


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Ive got this one ...http://www.dr.ca/confectionery-coating-pan-attachment.html Its abou $75 cheaper. Use it all the time and it works well. Its cost effective if you are going to regularly sell panned items. Panning is a blend of art and science. The more you can control your environment the better. Takes some practice and time to figure out what makes it work, what doesnt work. Its not something you can just put on your machine and go. But the more you do it, the more you develop a feel/intuition for what works and doesn't work.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
09/22/11 05:39:39PM
78 posts

Questions about using a wheel based tempering machine with enrober


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I have one too, a Prefamac. Very sturdy machine, built like a tank, runs day and night. It is some work to change over. You have to drain the tank and then refill. I only enrobe in dark, but I can see a change-out really taking no more than half an hour. Easy enough to refill, but you'd have to wait for the melt if you don't have another holder/melting tank. If you have a lot of volume it's worth it. Get a blower and detailer as well-it will make a big difference in the quality and appearance of your end product. You can email me on jgstern at mac dot com if you would like more info. Also, takes a bit of practice to get the results you want-the machine does nothing for you, you have to do everything for the machine.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
08/28/11 05:36:05PM
78 posts

better pricing for better cacao


Posted in: Opinion

It would be interesting to hear how guarantees for quality, processing specs, etc. are made binding, so that whoever is buying knows they're getting what they've paid for. I bring this point up because it is difficult, if not nearly impossible, to control post-harvest activities of a farmer or even more so farmers-in the case of a coop or association-here in Ecuador. People will make promises, will tell you this or that can be done, but when it comes to the final product, how would/could a buyer or buyers coop insist and ensure they are getting the quality they want? I know that offering better pricing is an incentive, but it's not a guarantee. With the lack of transparency in the trade here, as well as no clear standards for grading beans across the board (both in Ecuador and internationally) how do you ensure your quality standards are being met?
updated by @Jeff Stern: 07/31/15 09:21:16AM
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
07/25/11 05:11:32PM
78 posts

Slab truffle issues


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Here's my two cents, would love to hear anyone else's technique as well...

1. you need a spreader that is just a bit wider than your entire slab, so that you can run it flush on top of the ganache frame and even out the thickness in one sweep (or several). It helps to have a little bit more ganache than what fits in the frame so that as you hit the edge, the whole top surface remains flush and you remove any extra as you hit the end of the frame.

2. not mixed well enough? not tempered? not firm enough? could be a number of things. i've had this problem too, but usually when the ganache is too soft. also, your ambient temperature needs to be just right (65f-69f) seems to work best, firm enough for it to hold together, soft enough to cut on a guitar without breaking strings.

3. maybe improperly tempered...fats will separate out if the ganache is not properly tempered (and the chocolate within) which leads me to 4.

4. I would say the 105 honey/butter mix is way too hot, should be more like 86F or so when adding, that could throw off any of the good crystals in your butter/chocolate mix if the quantity was big enough. The sequence seems kind of odd to me too-most ganaches using butter and another sweetener (honey, fondant, glucose, invert sugar) are processed by first mixing together the butter and sweetener, then adding the chocolate. You might try just combining all the butter and honey first without heating it (at room temp) then adding in the chocolate. Your mileage may vary but I think that's a better route to try.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
07/25/11 05:02:16PM
78 posts

Tales from Chocolate Mecca: Oaxaca


Posted in: Travels & Adventures

great post! lots of amaranth here too and the wonderful amaranth popcorn too!
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
06/14/11 04:46:20PM
78 posts

Organic cacao liquor in bulk in the US / Canada ?


Posted in: Classifieds

If you would like to source this directly from Ecuador for shipment into the US or Canada, let me know. I can get product made to your specs with your chosen variety of beans from Ecuador (Arriba/Naciona, CCN-51, or a blend.) Please contact me here on thechocolatelife.com
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
06/13/11 02:54:54PM
78 posts

Sourcing Ecuadorian Cacao


Posted in: Travels & Adventures

Ecuador is the worlds largest grower of fine flavor cocoa. This comes with a caveat, however; if you dont know your way around you can easily end up with a mix of true Nacional beans and CCN-51, or CCN-51 beans being passed off as something else, which will in turn affect the final quality of your product. Also, you need to know if the beans youre buying have been properly fermented and dried. If youre interested in visiting Ecuador just to get to know the cocoa and chocolate industry up close, or to buy beans direct from the source, or a bit of both, please give me a shout. I have over 5 years experience in Ecuador in the cocoa/chocolate industry and numerous industry contacts at all levels. I also offer training in chocolate and confectionery (specifically pralines/filled chocolates, enrobing, etc) and can custom tailor an itinerary to meet your needs. We are experienced in logistics and import/export as well to help expedite delivery of your beans.
updated by @Jeff Stern: 04/29/15 07:35:28AM
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
06/13/11 02:53:54PM
78 posts

Lloveras Conches


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Anyone out there with experience with Lloveras conches (Spanish made)? Please let me know if you have worked with them. Thanks!
updated by @Jeff Stern: 04/12/15 08:40:02AM
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/31/11 06:33:31PM
78 posts

Renting kitchen space by the hour?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

In the DC area 4 years ago I paid $30 an hour and that was cheap! And I fully concur with others remarks regarding odors, cleanliness, and organization. As well, it's sometimes a good thing, sometimes not, if you can arrange for storage space of some of your products so you don't have to schlep everything every time you go.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/30/11 10:19:02PM
78 posts

New ChocolateLife Resource Wiki


Posted in: News & New Product Press

Sounds good Clay. I can be a resource for all chocolate things Ecuador.

Jeff

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/25/11 07:10:54PM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Have not and dont know much about them. Also just found this company...Pomati. Dont know if they have a US distributor....http://www.pomati.it/eng/carrello_ricopertura.htm.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/25/11 04:56:01PM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Point taken, Brian. :-) If I had had another $10k when I was buying, I would definitely have considered a machine like the Selmi! But I didn't...
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/25/11 04:52:43PM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

I absolutely agree! You have to understand and be able to temper before doing anything.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/25/11 10:30:14AM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

I fully agree with Samuel's observation about the advantages of the Selmi over the wheel machines as far as continuous production. That being said, however, you can easily add melted chocolate into the tank of a JKV or Prefamac, as long as it's not way too hot or cold, if you need to refill the tank. Let it run a few minutes to mix and your batch will stay crystallized just fine. Prefamac's 30 kg tank will supply enough to enrobe for many hours in temper-you'd have to be doing a lot of product to have to refill the tank in a day-by a lot of product I mean at least 5,000+ 2.5x 2.5cm pieces (about 50 kgs in total product weigh ie enrobed centers). As far as production speeds, with two of us running the Prefamac we can do 700-1,000 pieces per hour.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/24/11 06:42:09PM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Actually, like the JKV machines, with the Prefamac you temper the chocolate once and don't have to retemper throughout the day. As the chocolate thickens, you just notch up the thermostat a couple tenths of a degree to break crystal down. You can temper once and just, as mentioned by cheebs, keep an eye on it throughout the day and adjust as necessary-but not retemper. I also like that the Prefamac is built like a tank, easy to fix if necessary. I've been running mine nearly daily 2.5 years without a hitch. My Prefamac doesn't have light bulbs over the top for additional ambient heat but has ceramic heat lamps-all heat but no light.

I too agree, you're paying for more bells and whistles. As Michael Reccchiuti said to me about his Sollich enrober, the machine does nothing for you, you have to do everything for the machine. I think the final quality of your product is far more dependent on your skill as a chocolatier than anything-it's like photography, you can have the best equipment in the world and still take sucky pictures if you don't know how to use it. Or, have a lousy camera and take really great shots-if you know what you're doing. Not to say that JKVs, Hilliards, or Prefamacs are lousy-but they may require a bit more "operator" knowledge and skill.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/24/11 05:28:09PM
78 posts

If Selmi is the Cadalac what is a JKV and why?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

I cant speak to the Selmi or JKV directly but I have a Prefamac, which is quite similar in design to the JKV and am very happy with it. I suggest you contact Brian Donaghy at Tomric about the Selmis, they are the US distiributor. His quote to me was "they rock." If you'd like more info about the Prefamac I'm happy to share my experience.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/17/11 06:16:15PM
78 posts

Why not heat your chocolate pouring room?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Perhaps generally not a bad idea, if you can immediately remove your filled molds or what have you to a much cooler area as others have pointed out. Otherwise, because of the warm ambient temperature, you will have the problem with latent heat of crystallization, and nothing would crystallize properly, and all your molded pieces would bloom. Also, even if you are holding properly crystallized chocolate in the 90-93F range, it will still continue to crystallize and thicken to a solid form (though still a very soft one) unless you are regularly doing something to break crystal down, like fluctuating the temperature to the upside occasionally.

I visited the Recchiuti operation in San Francisco two years ago, and he had made a "hot" room from a walk-in freezer by removing the cooling component and adding a heater. Basically, he kept it at somewhere in the upper 90 degree range and had large, painter size buckets of warm, liquid chocolate stored there. So whenever he needed warm chocolate, to say add to the enrober or other machines, he wouldn't have to wait for it to melt. He could just go in and grab a bucket of whatever type chocolate he needed. However, I don't believe he had the chocolate crystallized or "in temper" in old speak.

I work generally in a 62-67F environment and never have trouble with molding, with the exception of thick bars which have to be blown with a fan to remove the heat quickly.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
04/26/11 12:49:11PM
78 posts

Organic Beans Question


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

That freezing process doesn't sound very feasible for a container!
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
04/24/11 10:10:04AM
78 posts

Organic Beans Question


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Thanks! You're the first person to provide any kind of answer to this question.

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
03/28/11 04:48:00PM
78 posts

Organic Beans Question


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Have passed this question around the world without an answer. As I understand, most if not all sea shipments of agricultural products such as rice, corn, and cacao must be fumigated (usally with methyl bromide) before shipping. I would like to know, under what circumstances (type of container used, or via air transport, etc.) are beans shipped and guaranteed not fumigated?-since any fumigated beans would no longer be "organic". It seems that fumigation is a very standard operating procedure performed not once, but sometimes 2x, on cocoa beans. So how do "organic" beans arrive stateside or to other cocoa processing countries?

I have also heard that some companies buy organic liquor in the country of origin, and have it shipped, since liquor does not require fumigation.


updated by @Jeff Stern: 04/09/15 04:46:07PM
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/27/11 06:03:20AM
78 posts

Chocolatier Salaries in the US


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Since salary info for the "chocolatier" job category is so hard to come by, I decided to go right to the source-everyone in the chocolate industry. Interested in getting a feel for what independent chocolate shops with a successfully running operation are making. I'm not interested in those with large operations (25 employees or more), but I am interested in small to mid-size operations that are beyond Mom and Pop shops, and have a full-time professional chocolatier to run the chocolate and candy making operations, responsible for overseeing a production staff, etc. Any input is much appreciated.

updated by @Jeff Stern: 04/15/15 10:32:31PM
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/10/13 08:11:46PM
78 posts

MaraƱon Chocolate - Cacao Thought to Be Extinct Found in Peru


Posted in: Chocolate Education

One questions that came to mind...if pure Nacional is extinct, and Dan Pearson says the USDA gene analysis found it is identical to pure Nacional and its "marker," where did they get the marker? What is the actual reference point here?

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
11/27/10 09:06:59AM
78 posts

preserved cocoa pods how do i get one


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Hi LauraGot your email but my response was bounced back, here it is:I have sent to Australia and can give you the names of the people if you wish to contact them about their experience. I know they had to pay some extra money for the quarantine and wait several weeks before the pods were released, and also that they drilled a hold in one of the pods. Below is the general information. Look it over and let me know if and when you'd like to proceed. Thanks!JeffExperience chocolate in its original state-The Cocoa Pod. We are the world's only supplier of dried cocoa pods. The pods come in three forms:* Whole Dried Pods ($5.99)* Open pods with Seeds Inside ($6.99)* Open without seeds ($5.99)These are a great novelty item for a chocolate shop or specialty coffee shop: customers also like them for purchase, especially children. Fun and educational, they make a great conversation piece as well. We ship worldwide and offer quantity discounts. We also sell traditional jute sacks for transporting cocoa beans at $6.50 each.Shipping starts at about $16 for one pod, but goes down in price substantially the more you order. Shipping is based on weight, as pods can vary in size. Shipping times are approximately 10-15 business days, give or take 5.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
11/27/10 04:49:27PM
78 posts

dipping machines...


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You could always buy a Mol'd'art or other brand 10kg melter. Holds more chocolate, easier to dump back into, and cheaper than a Hilliard's Little Dipper. I own both. Use the ladle to fill or the syringe or pastry bag method. You can always quickly melt and add more to the holder using the microwave. Much better solution IMHO.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
07/09/10 08:51:01PM
78 posts

About to give up!


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

First, you should check the temperature ranges for tempering your different chocolates-these can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. I know, for example, Barry Callebaut prints them on their bars of courverture. Dark is usually more like a 90-92F range, milk and 86-88, and milk 83-86ish. Second, dont add seed until its nearly down to the range of temper (proper crystallization). That is, add your seed for dark around 95 or lower-it works fastest if you add small pieces that will completely melt, preferably shavings of tempered chocolate-or you can add a chunk, give it more time, and then fish out whats not melted once youre ready to go to work and its tempered. You dont need to go through the whole temperature curve for tempering if you are seeding, that may be part of your problem. When initially melting the chocolate however, make sure the temperature is up there at 110 or so, that guarantees all crystals, good and bad, are melted out. When you have added your seed, give it at least 15 minutes or more, check it on the back of a spoon. It should set up in no more than 2-3 minutes in a 62-68F degree environment, which is optimal for chocolate work. You should observe it closely, the chocolate should look uniform, with no spotting, blotches or streaks. If it sets up quickly but still has any of these characteristics, the chocolate is either not completely tempered yet (crystallization is not homogenous throughout your batch), or you have some bad crystals, or both. Give it more time and movement, and check again. If the spotting, blotchiness, or streaks dont go away, start over from 110F again. Hope this is useful. Best of luck,Jeff
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
07/09/10 06:31:34PM
78 posts

brix hydrometers/ refractometers


Posted in: Geek Gear - Cool Tools

I got mine at JB Prince. This is the place to go for many hard-to-find items.
Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
01/24/13 07:59:50AM
78 posts

long shelf life fillings


Posted in: Recipes

Nut pastes (gianduja, marzipan) are good but you have to watch out for fat migration which will soften your shells over time.

Butter based ganaches are good, for even less water content you might try using clarified butter (you can buy it off the shelf from many restaurant suppliers).

Jeff Stern
@Jeff Stern
05/03/10 05:28:48PM
78 posts

Cocoa species


Posted in: Opinion

There's supposedly a new high yielding variety being grown in Sacha, Ecuador. HIgher yielding than CCN-51. I don't know the specifics but they're calling it "super cacao" here because it supposedly has great flavor and enormous yields. I was just at Tulicorp last Wednesday and they claim it's true....
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