Forum Activity for @Andrea Bauer

Andrea B
@Andrea B
02/11/17 11:58:05AM
92 posts

Colored Cocoa Butter stayed in the mold


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Was your colored cocoa butter properly tempered when you added it to the mold?  That could cause it to stay in the mold and not adhere to the chcolate even if the chcolate was properly tempered.

As for cleaning them, I'd run hot water from the tap and fill the molds allowing them to sit.  You can probably get most of the cocoa butter out this way or by using the sprayer.  You will probably need to clean them with cotton balls really well to remove any stubborn bits.

Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/30/15 09:11:14PM
92 posts

What is shelf life of coconut cream vs dairy cream in a ganache? Same?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I have been making dairy-free chocolates for a few years now.  I've experimented with canned coconut milk (and coconut cream), coconut oil and other nondairy milks for making ganaches.  I haven't noticed any difference in shelf life from when I made dairy ganaches to now using canned coconut milk and/or coconut oil.  I've always considered the shelf life to be about a month.  You need to consider the water content of whatever nondairy substitute you are using to help you think about the shelf life.  The higher the water content (water activity), the shorter the shelf life.  I have not used agave as a sweetener, but I'm wondering if you can think of it like glucose which can actually stabilize your product and extend its shelf life.  I found this website with specific information about agave being used as a stabilizer.  Go to:http://www.international-organics.com/info-files/Intl_Organics_Organic_Agave_Info.pdf

Hope you find success with your dairy-free chocolates. 

Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/19/15 08:11:42PM
92 posts

shell molding issues


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

It sounds like your chocolate is too thin.  Try making the chocolate shell a bit thicker.  Also, are you using cotton balls to wipe out your molds prior to use? 

Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/22/15 08:02:31PM
92 posts

forgot to add seed chocolate


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

You mentioned having a mess to clean up...  I hope you know you can pop your molds into the freezer, freeze the chocolate and then just unmold it.  No harm, no foul.  You can then re melt and reuse the chocolate.  We all have those kinds of days when we realize later we've made a mistake.

Andrea B
@Andrea B
12/09/14 05:39:16PM
92 posts

CALLEBAUT L6040NV INTENSE BITTER SWEET GANACHE CHOCOLATE


Posted in: Opinion

The format says callets so I'm guessing it's just the chocolate. The mention of ganache in the heading is probably just a typo. You could contact Qzina directly to confirm.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
11/12/14 03:37:20PM
92 posts

Microwave Temper Problem


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Your working temperature depends on which type/brand of chocolate you are using. I only work with dark chocolate, so my working temp is 88-90. I'm sure there are other opinions on this, but I actually seed my chocolate at a warmer temp than you do. If all of your seed is melting out at the temp you add it, then I don't see any issue. All of the crystals you want (V) from your seed won't melt out if you cool to 70 and then rewarm because the different crystals melt out at different temperatures. As you rewarm you are eliminating the crystals you don't want and leaving behind the ones you do want.As for only doing a cup... Your chocolate isn't ruined or unusable if it has fat bloom or sugar bloom. Just simply remelt and try to temper again. Really the only time your chocolate is ruined is when is gets burnt from overheating. If you temper a larger batch just use a cookie sheet with sides, line it with parchment and pour your extra chocolate on it and allow it to set up. Even if the temper isn't correct you can still use the chocolate.Hope this helps. I think you will find it easier if you try to temper a larger batch. You don't get just one shot at tempering chocolate. Keep melting and retempering assuming it isn't scorched.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
11/12/14 10:44:54AM
92 posts

Microwave Temper Problem


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Since you are aware of air temperature and humidity issues, I will skip that. I think you need to alter your tempering method. Do the steps as you described them, but cool well below 90. I'd cool down to 80 and then slowly rewarm using the microwave on shorts bursts of time at reduced power. Stir a lot as you rewarm and I think that will help you. Tempering by hand is a different method than the one used by machines. Machines are able to control the process and elimintate unwanted crystals (leading to bloom) skipping the added step I described. I use this method all the time and it works very well.I'm also concerned about the amount of chocolate you are tempering. Did you mean to say you were tempering a cup of chocolate? It is very difficult to temper correctly the smaller amount you go.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
10/30/14 01:42:28PM
92 posts

Topping chocolate after it dries?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I usually have a batch of tempered chocolate on the side and dip whatever I am putting on my finished chocolate. You can do this with nuts, coconut, or whatever. If you do what you are suggesting (steaming) then you will alter the temper and if not, then just ruin the shine. Buy a set of tweezers to make dipping and placing the item on your chocolate easier and neater.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
08/28/14 10:32:15AM
92 posts

What to use if there is no rich cream available


Posted in: Tasting Notes

I would not substitute all oil to replace cream. You will need to experiment with the proportions, but you can use canned coconut milk and some amount of coconut oil. Definitely do not use canola or olive oil. I've found that even the most mild olive oil has too strong a taste for ganaches/fillings and canola oil can leave an off-putting after taste.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
08/07/14 10:10:36AM
92 posts

Warped white chocolate bars


Posted in: Tasting Notes

I had the same thought as Sebastian about the cooling causing the curvature. In addition, I was thinking your inclusions might have something to do with it as well. Are you using a lot of nibs or other inclusions? Maybe try cutting back on the amount just a bit to see if that helps. The inclusions might be affecting how the chocolate acts as it contracts causing it to curve.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/16/14 10:20:57AM
92 posts

Is Ecole Chocolate online program for me?


Posted in: Chocolate Education

Since the course is self-directed it is mostly reading and then practicing. It is well organized information, which is why the course is good for someone with no other experience. Plus there is a lot of good information regarding the history of chocolate.Based on your experience you could do just fine continuing on your own. It sounds like you are already developing an understanding of how to temper chocolate. It is a continual learning process anyway with success and failure along the way.One thing that might benefit you is to find someone locally who is a chocolate maker or has experience who you can hire for some hands on training. Maybe an hour or so to see how someone else tempers chocolates. We learn not just by reading but by modeling what we see as well.Once you have a handle on tempering then you might want to consider spending time learning (either through Ecole or in you own) about how to avoid contamination, mold growth and the best ways to extend shelf life.I took the Ecole class you discuss and enjoyed it. I also did some professional-level classes and continue to develop my skills on my own. I do think its possible for you to do it on you own but it will probably just take longer.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/09/14 10:43:30AM
92 posts

Bloom "stripes" on dipped chocolates


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

What is the temp of your center? That should be at room temp or it will throw your chocolate out of temper. The other thing that comes to mind is to continually stir the chocolate you are working with so the temperature is consistent throughout the mass while you are dipping.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
06/25/14 10:15:51AM
92 posts

Airbrushing chocolate molds


Posted in: Tasting Notes

Some of the airbrushing liquids from ChefRubber are for decoration only (i.e. Showpieces) and are not edible. Ditto with the other responses - use colored cocoa butter. It will take a little practice to get the hang of. Call ChefRubber if you aren't sure what you are buying is edible/I edible.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/22/14 10:03:15PM
92 posts

Fruit purée brands


Posted in: Opinion

I have seen the same thing as you with the Boiron flavors. I haven't seen the Sicoly brand you mentioned. I was hoping someone out there had some experience with or an opinion about Perfect Pure (Napa). I am closer to CA so the shipping distance would be shorter. Otherwise, I have ordered for Albert Uster (outside of DC) and have been happy with their pure (caraman brand).I hear you about the shipping. I need to order enough to make overnight shipping worthwhile but not more pure than I can go through before it's no good anymore.I used to make some of my own pures. I found that to be too unreliable for consistency of flavor and the unreliable availability of various fruits where I live. Of course, I have lots of other things to do with my time and buying pures is soooo much easier!Thanks for the feedback.Take care,Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/20/14 05:00:23PM
92 posts

Fruit purée brands


Posted in: Opinion

Hi All,I am in need of some fruit pures and am interested to know which brands people prefer. I have a brand I already use but I haven't been going through it as fast as expected and I feel the quantity I need to order is too much. I'd like to hear which brands have great flavors and are as pure as possible (fruit and a minimal amount of sugar if possible). I use them to make fruit-flavored ganaches as well as pates and the occasional jelly (for inclusion in chocolates)Thanks,Andrea
updated by @Andrea B: 04/10/15 06:47:55AM
Andrea B
@Andrea B
03/29/14 10:57:59AM
92 posts

Best way to melt Cacao Butter?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Right on the cooktop - don't leave it unattended though. It melts quickly. I usually remove it when about half is melted and swirl it until the rest melts.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
11/25/13 11:17:17PM
92 posts

Does anyone know how much money I need to start a small bean to chocolate bar shop.


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Part of starting a business is writing a detailed business plan, which includes investigating the costs you are talking about here as well as every other aspect of running a business. You will never succeed without a business plan. I would suggest you research the equipment you might need and the costs of the various options at the same time. This is due diligence and you really need to complete this before you decide if opening this business is even viable.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
10/23/13 09:48:01PM
92 posts

Keeping temper when melting a chocolate


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

There really is no "lazy" way to temper chocolate. It requires a very precise methodology. It is highly doubtful that you could melt your chocolate and still keep it in temper without having to re-temper especially if you are doing it by hand (i.e. Melting by stovetop or microwave).I assume you mean you are using the milk chocolate to make a ganache filling for the middle of your bonbon (and not just straight milk chocolate)? My opinion is that tempering won't make a difference. There are people who swear by tempering their ganache. I've tried it both ways and actually prefer untempered chocolate in my ganache.Chocolate is a very fickle thing to work with and you just need to bite the bullet and do it the right way.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/17/13 10:31:37AM
92 posts

A question everybody can contribute to...


Posted in: Opinion

I prefer to pay for everything possible with CC. It is very convenient for me to not have to carry cash plus I can track expenses. I do think most consumers have an idea of what it costs the vendor to accept CCs but maybe they don't factor in the Internet and equipment costs. That said, I still think accepting CCs is a cost of doing business. I can understand a small vendor having a sign up saying they only accept cash but for some reason I find it annoying when a place has a sign up saying they charge less when you pay with cash. Locally there is a place that does this for a commodity you can buy at various places. Their cost, even at their "reduced cash price" is higher than you can buy it elsewhere and pay however you want.I am also the customer who would not be incented to pay cash for the possibility of winning a basket of goodies. I look at those giveaways as a way for the store to collect my personal information for the mailing database.Where I live, I have not found stores willing to offer a discount either when I buy in bulk, buy an expensive item or pay in cash especially for an expensive item. I have asked! I can't see a store lowering their prices overall if they decided to not accept CCs - I think most would simply keep prices where they are and pocket the difference.Keep us posted on how you decide to handle this. It would be interesting to see the response down the road if you decide to offer a cash discount to see if it caused confusion with the customers (I.e. how much time do you take out of the day explaining the specifics to customers) or if they seem to really love it and it maybe boosts your sales.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/12/13 04:09:56PM
92 posts

bloom from a peanut butter cup?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Amber,

Your reply pops up and then quickly disappears. I've tried on 2 computers to read it. As best as I can tell there arequite a fewingredients in your purchased peanut butter cups (all natural yes, but I think it could still be "cleaner").

Depending on what exactly you are trying to accomplish with your finished product you could probably do a variation of Wybauw's recipe that calls for cocoa butter and confectioner's sugar in addition to a bit of salt and the peanut butter. I do a filled bonbon using this formulation (using all-natural peanut butter with nothing extra added). I had some sit basically all summer (no AC and lots of 90 degree days where it probably reached 80 inside) and I didn't see any fat migration/bloom until after probably 3 months - long after when it should/could be sold.

Not sure about the milk fat. Did I see it say anhydrous before it disappeared on me? If so then it probably serves as a preservative. It could also contribute to mouth feel - it might make it more creamy.

Hope this helps,

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/12/13 10:47:39AM
92 posts

bloom from a peanut butter cup?


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

What else is in your peanut butter? You are correct that this should not be happening. As I'm sure you are aware there is a lot of oil in peanut butter so the bloom you are seeing is probably a result of the fat.. You should be able to resolve this issue and still be all natural. Chances are that the ones you sourced have something in them that helps prevent this.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/04/13 04:35:18PM
92 posts

Mold Release / Ring Formation Issue in Mold


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

The one I have an issue with is a polycarbonate mold, so not sure if your idea would work or not. Probably worth a shot with the more flexible mold when you feel like spending the money :). Clay's suggestions are definitely a cheaper way to go. I've tried using my mold in various conditions and have gotten the same result. Luckily I didn't buy loads of this mold and don't feel bad setting it aside for ones I don't have an issue with.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
09/03/13 07:48:11PM
92 posts

Mold Release / Ring Formation Issue in Mold


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I have a square mold that is smaller and deeper than this one but has a smooth top and I run into the same issue. Unfortunately, I don't have a good solution for you since I've never figured out a way to stop it. For a while I thought maybe it had to do with the ambient air temp, humidity, and cooling time of the chocolate. I also polish my molds before each use but the marks keep coming back. I find that molds with a large flat surface on what is the top of the chocolate usually have this issue and I've opted to avoid these types of molds.Maybe someone else has a great solution to fix this problem, but you are not alone and I don't think it is any kind of defect in the mold and I highly doubt it has anything to do with the temper of your chocolate or cooling times. Sorry I don't have anything better to offer.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/08/13 07:17:31PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

I just did a quick read through of that thread. I am no expert of "raw" by any means but from what I have seen it is such an ill-defined distinction it's no wonder there is so much confusion.I only know the basics of bean-to-bar but have always wondered what the temperatures are when the raw beans are being fermented right after being removed from the pod and are piled up. Thinking with my science brain I would think that the pile of fermenting beans would produce a fair amount of heat possibly already making them no longer "raw". Beyond that there is the roasting and the heat of friction from grinding and conching/refining, etc. as you well know. The idea that chocolate is raw seems absurd to me.I think some people feel if they take the chocolate they use for their finished product and don't heat it above their definition of raw (110 degrees, 118 degrees - just a few of the numbers I have seen) then it is raw in its finished state. This means they are completely ignoring what came before and where their chocolate came from. Clearly, it came directly off the tree in the form they are using it and is obviously raw - haha.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/08/13 06:33:36PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

Haha, I 2nd lagusta!! Remember as well, your comment is for vegan purists. Interestingly, white table sugar has been able to be given the distinction of kosher pareve which according to Jewish dietary laws means it contains no meat or milk in any form. This is because they feel the bone char is so far removed from the animal source it is not considered an animal product any longer. I guess the choice to use table sugar depends on where you fall on the vegan spectrum. I personally use evaporated cane juice (organic)..BTW, I got my info off of the Grassroots Veganism website when I was researching this topic some time ago. There are lots of different types of vegans so it is a choice to make...:)
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/07/13 08:11:35PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

I will have to order some deodorized coconut oil and play with it some more. I've been using undeodorized to date. Thanks for the tips. There really is a lot of trial and error when veganizing some recipes.I am amazed about the tofu as well. I wouldn't worry about the old perceptions about tofu. Anybody who is vegan now and is seeking out high quality products including chocolates probably won't give it a 2nd thought. The only issue I see would be the people who think that they will have an increase in estrogen from too much soy. I've read a fair amount about it this and do not see any scientific studies to back up the idea of an "estrogen reaction" to tofu. That said, you seem to have plenty of options for the person concerned with their soy consumption.I actually don't have a shop. I basically make enough to be in business but we give most of it away.I have a good caramel recipe but have never gotten into making toffee. I am looking for a good soft caramel filling to replace the one in Andrew Schott's book that calls for white chocolate. It is so soft and creamy I just don't know how to recreate it in a vegan way.
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/07/13 05:50:41PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

Hmmmm, tofu? I would think the water content of tofu alone would knock it out of the realm of possibilities... I actually haven't tried Charm School. I am not quite as worried about it being able to be tempered since I want it primarily for fillings.I took a look at your website. It looks really great. You have great creativity in your flavors, especially since they are vegan. You are further along than I am in the recipe development phase of vegan chocolates. Of course you probably spend far more time on it! I still haven't found a "ganache" formulation that I am entirely happy with as I like it really creamy but don't want to use vegan butter. I don't mind using coconut oil or coconut milk but sometimes get too much coconut flavor coming through. I just need to play with it more.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/05/13 07:02:30PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

I was holding out hope for the Organic Nectars white chocolate. I may be more sensitive to very sweet things now being vegan, but I thought the white chocolate was very sweet. I only tried one bite - maybe I should try it again :). Their milk isn't what I was looking for at all. Their price is too high as well to use in any bulk capacity.The other thing to bear in mind is that these vegan white and milk chocolates won't be "real" chocolate so they may not temper like you expect if they temper at all.If you ever find something worthwhile let me know ans I will do likewise.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
07/05/13 05:36:49PM
92 posts

vegan milk and white chocolate


Posted in: Opinion

I too have been keeping an eye out for a decent vegan white and/or milk chocolate. To date, I haven't found anything worthwhile. I'm sure I have tasted all of the same vegan options that you have. I had high hopes for one white chocolate but the cost would be astronomical to use in a business setting. I read about a vegan milk chocolate by Callebaut that was only available in Europe. I've been trying to track it down but so far no luck. I just don't I think that any manufacturers (large or small) have discovered a decent formulation for vegan options. Add to that the cost of the ingredients and I think that is why you haven't had any luck.Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
05/25/13 10:29:27AM
92 posts

Caramel - changed sugars, now it gets grainy quickly


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I can't speak to the mixture of sorghum and brown rice, but cane sugar tends to have larger granules the processed white sugar. make sure when cook your caramel as low and slow as possible and wipe down the edges of the pot often with a wet pastry brush. I switched to cane sugar last year and had a few batches turn out pretty badly. Stirring thoroughly at the beginning and the wet pastry brush (more often than with white sugar) really seemed to help.
Andrea
Andrea B
@Andrea B
05/13/13 11:37:48PM
92 posts

losing temper w/tempering


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Yes and feel free to contact me. If you have a question, I'll get back to you as quickly as I can.

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
05/13/13 09:37:56PM
92 posts

losing temper w/tempering


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

OK, if the temperature ranges are working better, then make sure you are stirring a lot. Your chocolate, as a mass, will not cool evenly. Stirring often helps create the type of crystals you want and the stirring will help prevent uneven temperatures throughout the mass(and bloom).When you reheat from your low temperature, make sure to do it slowly. If you go over your target working temperature you'll have to start over. I reheat in the microwave and 50% power in short bursts (6-10 seconds depending on the temperature). As your temperature drops, you can put your bowl back in the microwave and do a short burst again to bring it back into working range. I taught myself to temper and so I know you can figure it out as well.

BTW, I bought a small tempering machine thinking I'd use that once I had learned to temper by hand and I've sold it and temper everything by hand. If I was doing higher volume I might consider another machine, but until I would need something that might temper around 10 pounds at a time I'll just do it by hand. I found the bowls on the smaller tempering machines too small to work with.

Continued good luck!

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
05/13/13 07:39:30PM
92 posts

losing temper w/tempering


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Julie,

I posted a reply some time ago and saw some additional posts over the last few days. I have to say, I know there are a variety of ways people temper their chocolate,but I am a bit confused about your method. Are you tempering by hand (and not by machine)? If that is the case, then I think you would be better suited to a different method. It sounds like you melt your chocolate out, seed it and then simply cool it to 90 degrees to work with it. I think you should melt it out (maybe to 116-118), seed it (I don't follow a hand and fast rule of 25% - I usually add a handful of chips), cool it to about 79-80 and then rewarm to about 89-90 to work with it. I am using the same Callebaut as you and have had great success with this method.

I know there are people who melt their chocolate, seed it and then cool it to working temperature but they all seem to be using melters. I think achieving temper this way is much more tricky especially when trying to do it by hand.

Keep trying, and you will figure it out. Also, bear in mind your ambient air temperature and humidity levels will affect tempering. Your issues may be due to those differences especially if you had been successful before. I know it warmed uphere in my location yesterday and I had trouble removing chocolates from molds when I had no issue last week and all of the molds were done at the same time.

Good luck,

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/25/13 08:01:58PM
92 posts



HI,

I think looking at a balance sheet is a bit too simplified when considering the question. What comes in and out tells you how viable a business is that is up and running but it gives no indication or how viable a new business might be.

I am pretty familiar with various business models and I asked about her net numbers because she needs to think about how much cash she has on hand. I should have also asked questions like did she already pay herselfbefore accounting for her net profits or were her net profits her salary (yes, some people do this)? In addition to looking at her projections for this potential new retail space she needs to consider not only what she might do in business based on her current salesbut what the worst case scenario might be. No one wants to consider what the failure scenario might look like and how that will affect the overall business. How long can she sustain a retail location if sales are not as projected? How much debt is she comfortable carrying? How badly will it affect her current business and how long will it take to recoverif the retail space doesn't work out as projected. Will the wholesale side even survive if the retail side fails?

All of that said, I am impressed with her sales and with her initiative. There is something to be said for taking a risk, but it should be a calculated risk with all potential outcomes considered and not just a breakeven scenario.

I hope she keeps us posted on her decision!

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/24/13 07:58:04PM
92 posts



I've been looking at this post and the replies and am kind of curious if anyone is willing to share their net numbers. I would think that gross numbers don't really paint a clear picture...

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/11/13 09:39:34AM
92 posts

praline paste storage


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Ok - thanks.

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/10/13 07:11:30PM
92 posts

praline paste storage


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Hi,

I made praline pastetoday for a specific recipe and have some extra. How do I store it? Room temperature? Fridge? Freezer?

Thanks,

Andrea


updated by @Andrea B: 04/10/15 06:38:02PM
Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/05/13 02:09:25PM
92 posts

Fruit ganache


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Sweeteners like glucose do several things for ganaches. They increase shelf life, improve texture and stabilize it (i.e prevent separation). They increase shelf life of a ganache by binding with water which lowers water activity levels and making it more resistant to spoilage.

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/05/13 12:44:46PM
92 posts

Fruit ganache


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I don't know much about freeze dried fruits. I've never used them after they have been rehydrated. I have used them in their freeze dried form and they are very flavor intensive. Raspberry might be too tart this way though and as I said I don't know about rehydrating them.

I have made raspberry ganache previouslyand my only comment is that you will lose some of the intensity of the fruit flavor. So if a subtle raspberry flavor is what you want a ganache is a great way to go.You'd probably be just fine making a raspberry-flavored ganache for the cake and not have to worry about the mold issue. You will get a more intense raspberry flavor if you reduce the puree before adding it. You could also extend the shelf life if you use glucose (corn syrup) in the ganache. Also, I'd use the puree in the ganache (as opposed to a jelly) because it will be a "fresher" flavor. Good luck with your cake and ganache! Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/05/13 10:15:16AM
92 posts

Fruit ganache


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

I would worry about mold with a fresh raspberry puree esp. since it will be sitting for several days. Fresh fruit purees are not boiled when they are made. You puree up the fruit, run it thru a sieve to remove seeds and then add about 10% sugar by remaining weight. That said, various recipes do call for reducing the puree in half before using it in a ganache (it intensifies the flavor and reduces water content). Other recipes don't call for the puree to be reduced at all. I have a suggestion that might avoid the issue for you. Consider making just a plain chocolate ganache. Then use your puree to make a "jelly" to put on as another layer on the cake (puree, sugar and pectin and then undercook it to avoid it being too thick). The flavor will be nice and intense and I think you wouldn't have to worry about mold nearly as much.

Andrea

Andrea B
@Andrea B
04/03/13 02:34:49PM
92 posts

Heating cabinet for chocolate airbrush


Posted in: Tasting Notes

You can try an inexpensive yogurt maker. They work at low heat. It can be trial and error but I've found that mine without the lid on it works well. I think mine was about $15. The brand of mine is Total Chef Yogurt Maker.

Andrea B
@Andrea B
03/23/13 03:24:33PM
92 posts

losing temper w/tempering


Posted in: Tech Help, Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

First thing to do is make sure your thermometer is reading correctly. You'll need to test that. Assumingthe range of your thermometeris large enoughyou can test it in boiling water (unless it is an IR thermometer). Then you should check your upper and lower temperatures you are working at with your chocolate. I personally don't have a concern about you starting to work with your chocolate at 89 degrees. I actually start at this temperature when I am molding and increase the temperatureslightly from there as the chocolate thickens up some.

All of that said, there are lots of things you might be doing that lead to your chocolate not tempering correctly. Generally speaking time, temperature and agitation are the factors in tempering. As a beginner it will take a lot of practice before you get it right and feel comfortable with it. When I started, I quickly figured out that before I was ready to mold or dip or whatever you plan to do I needed to get tempering down and then practice it a bunch of times before I even moved on to actually doing something with the chocolate. Keep practicing and you will figure it out.

Andrea

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