What Makes an Artisan Chocolate Artisan?

Clay Gordon
@clay
01/29/08 09:31:52AM
1,680 posts
Is artisan an overused word? Can a chain as large as Starbucks lay claim to the artisan label when it comes to a Starbucks-labeled chocolate?What does "artisan" mean to you and what characteristics does a chocolate product have to have in order to be truly artisan?


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/

updated by @clay: 04/11/15 09:48:05PM
Lorna
@lorna
01/29/08 11:22:04AM
15 posts
To me, artisan invokes that rushed, sweaty, melting scene in the movie Chocolat where a meal is prepared from some semblance of scratch by hand. If sweat isn't an ingredient (albeit omitted from the label in deference to the FDA), it isn't artisan.
Holly & Paul Stabin
@holly-paul-stabin
01/29/08 01:33:47PM
8 posts
Years ago, I studied figurative sculpture at the Scottsdale Artists School with masters from around the world. Given this experience, I'd say that an artisan is someone who creatively conceives, designs and executes a product. In the chocolate world - that would be a confection of sorts. Starbucks will probably "sub out" the work to various artisans and then present it as their own - and since it's mass market - who knows how great the quality will be? Given the quality of the coffee - I don't have great hopes for the chocolate.
Chocoflyer
@chocoflyer
02/08/08 05:09:48PM
71 posts
I agree with all the above- small batches, hand made rather than machine mass produced, created by one or a few designers that are like artists with flavors, constantly tweaking and trying new combos or designs for choc bars, truffles etc. Mostly I think it means that the choc does not come off an assembly line where the same product is reproduced a million times. Artisans usually have "limited editions" and when they're gone, thats it!
Chocoflyer
@chocoflyer
02/08/08 10:17:34PM
71 posts
Heres a link to a great article discussing the impact of growing artisan chocolatiers:http://www.chocolatezoom.com/article.php.Socially-Responsible-Artisan-Chocolates/33/Chocolate Zoom is an online chocolate magazine with GREAT info, highly recommended to ck out their archive section of articles on almost anything you can think of related to choc!
Brendan
@brendan
02/16/08 10:42:18PM
21 posts
I think the one thing that's really out if you call yourself an artisan is automation. I'd say that some level of tradition--recognized or deliberately disregarded or whatever--is also a factor. Whatever craft you do and whatever approach you take, it's bound to be informed by someone who came before you. And an artisanal product should reflect the character of the artisan. If you really wanted to, you could make a Twinkie by hand in your own kitchen, but it would still be a Twinkie. To me, the personal investment factor is a biggie.
Bethany Thouin
@bethany-thouin
03/10/08 02:25:58PM
5 posts
It is interesting reading all your comments. I am an artisanal chocolatier and I have to ask myself, what exactly does that mean?At what point in my own efforts to speed up production will I cross that line? Do I hire more people or buy more machines? It is hard. We chocolatiers desperately need to sell more truffles, in order to stay in business, but we love touching the chocolate, working with our hands, seeing the smiles on our employees faces as they experience the magic of it all.I think it is possible that the intrinsic love for the chocolate, for the process, for the magic is what will always keep me in the artisanal chocolate business. I may add a few machines to cut high labor cost, but I will always use fresh cream and small batch processes.To add to the discussion, or further it in some way. I think that when a chocolatier begins to use shelf like extenders, substituting vital ingredients, like cream with corn syrup - they are crossing that line - being more concerned about shelf life than the true nature of the product that they are selling. That is what says "mass market" to me.
Souheila Kurjie
@souheila-kurjie
03/10/08 11:48:45PM
5 posts
This comes straight from Webster's (ARTFL Project):Ar"ti*san (?; 277), n. [F. artisan, fr. L. artitus skilled in arts, fr. ars, artis, art: cf. It. artigiano. See Art, n.]1. One who professes and practices some liberal art; an artist. [Obs.]2. One trained to manual dexterity in some mechanic art or trade; and handicraftsman; a mechanic.This is willingly submitted to by the artisan, who can . . . compensate his additional toil and fatigue. Hume.Syn. -- Artificer; artist. -- Artisan, Artist, Artificer. An artist is one who is skilled in some one of the fine arts; an artisan is one who exercises any mechanical employment. A portrait painter is an artist; a sign painter is an artisan, although he may have the taste and skill of an artist. The occupation of the former requires a fine taste and delicate manipulation; that of the latter demands only an ordinary degree of contrivance and imitative power. An artificer is one who requires power of contrivance and adaptation in the exercise of his profession. The word suggest neither the idea of mechanical conformity to rule which attaches to the term artisan, nor the ideas of refinement and of peculiar skill which belong to the term artist.----Now, extrapolate this definition to Chocolate Artisan... You see?! :)
Mandy Floyd
@mandy-floyd
03/19/08 05:48:49PM
2 posts
What a wonderful description!
Mandy Floyd
@mandy-floyd
03/19/08 06:05:47PM
2 posts
As I was driving yesterday I saw a ad selling McDonald's new "handcrafted" breakfast burritos and I laughed. I see large chains trying to make themselves seem less large and foreboding by evoking sentiments like homemade & artisan. But, as hard as they try, I believe that my customers can easily determine the difference between what I do in my shop with chocolate and what McDonalds does with breakfast burritos.Besides, if the large chains devalue the terms that we use to describe the artistry of what we do, we're creative enough to describe our awesome-ness in new ways.
Jeff
@jeff
03/19/08 06:16:25PM
94 posts
Well ....the old dreaded "Artisan " word....I remember when dagoba got their big line a few years ago that would crank out 500,000 bars a day. I told them that day they were off the "Artisan Roll Call"; now they have been bought by Hersheys' "Artisan Chocolate Division".....go figure...I feel that if you dont go home at night reeking of cocoa butter and have chocolate stained clothes and cuticles you probably are NOT a chocolate artisan....I still use the term but I am loathe to do so now.......it has come to mean nothing in the marketplace.....
Clay Gordon
@clay
03/20/08 02:33:28PM
1,680 posts
Jeff:Having visited you at the end of a long day, I can attest to the chocolate stained clothing and cuticles. However, I am loathe to use the term "reek" (which implies malodorous) to anything remotely resembling fine chocolate.I agree that the term Artisan is overused to the point of near meaninglessness. Your point about Artisan Confection Company as a part of Hershey and the new Starbucks chocolate line (made for [not by] Artisan Confection Company) is a line of "artisan inspired" products.So what's a better term to use? There is the possibility to change the words people use. For example, we are moving away from the confusing "single-origin" in chocolate to just "origin" which is not only more succinct but a more accurate descriptor.Even the Fine Chocolate Industry Association is having a problem with this terminology. From their home page, "Our association members are artisans and craftsman[sic]." Craftsman is very close to the dictionary definition of artisan quoted in an earlier reply.So - do you have a better word or phrase? If you do I'd be happy to start championing it here.(The FCIA gets it wrong lots of the time. Here is their definition of couverture chocolate (they call it "bulk" chocolate):Bulk Chocolate used by chocolatiers to make confections. The only difference between eating chocolate and bulk chocolate is that bulk chocolate may contain small amounts of butter oil/milk fat. This assists in the tempering process when making the chocolate into confections. Since almost any confection that is going to be made will have some sort of milk product in it, chocolate containing small amounts of butter oil are still considered fine chocolate.This is so wrong that it makes me cringe. The difference between a couverture chocolate and an eating chocolate is that couverture chocolates have a relatively higher percentage of cocoa butter to cocoa solids so that when it's melted it has a lower viscosity. The FDA Standards of Identity allow for butter oil and milk fat in chocolate liquor! Butter oil is used as a preservative in chocolates that are sold through mass market outlets because it stabilizes the cocoa butter crystal and reduces the likelihood of bloom - a good thing when it can take six months or more for a product to make it through the distribution system. Milk fats are not necessary in the manufacture of chocolate and the FCIA's reasoning - you're going to be adding dairy anyway, probably - is bad rationalization, in my opinion.


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Jeff
@jeff
03/20/08 04:23:56PM
94 posts
ok. so maybe reek is not the right term when dealing with cocoa butter and chocolate but you got the point. alas that is still not a requirement I suppose.I do not have another term for what we do.Chocolate mechanic?Cacao Wower?Bar Bitch?Mould Jockey?Enrobing Slave?For now chocolate artisan is workin, but, as you see, it is being usurped by conglomerates and is misleading.. I thought the article in that issue of Cocoaroma where the "ask stan" section dealt with it was pretty good. I'll see if i can copy and paste it here....
Clay Gordon
@clay
04/07/08 02:51:26PM
1,680 posts
There is an article in a recent issue (Vol2#1) of Cocoaroma on this subject.The author "Stan Cottonwood" (a nom de plume) is quoted as saying "For a true artisan, the craft, the art, is everything. It's not the end result that matters, but rather the process ... the act of creation itself."I sent an e-mail off because I disagree with this position. I responded in part ..."I can be a craftsman, which speaks to a level of competency with tools and medium. I can be a master craftsman, which implies a higher level of competency. (One of the dictionary definitions of artisan seems to be synonymous with this understanding.) However, a master craftsman may not have the ability to imagine and create new things. In the case of a woodworker, they might only be able to work from plans drawn by someone else. A master craftsman in chocolate may only be able to execute someone else's recipes. However, the "true" artisan is never content with what has been, and that is where the emphasis on process and the act of creation becomes important. However, the "true artisan" HAS to be wedded to the end result. The "true artisan" (in chocolate) must be a master of his or her craft and be able and committed to manifesting their vision perfectly - and repeatedly.When is the "true" artisan chocolatier no longer an artisan? Maybe it's when they get tired and lose their inspiration and concern for the art/act of creation. But, would it be possible, if I was a master woodworker to continue to call myself a "master" if all (or significantly all) aspects of the manufacture of a piece were undertaken by computer-controlled machines? What if I created innovative new pieces using pencil sketches and hand tools and it is only after perfecting the piece [of furniture] that it gets turned over to machines? That analogy holds true with chocolate - at what point does the automation of the manufacturing process "disqualify" something as able to be called "artisan?"Or does it? I think most people who care about this issue think that it does. So I think artisan has to imply not only the act of creation but the manifestation, through mastery of the craft, in physical things and that it is the combination of these two elements that may be separates a "mere" craftsman from the "true artisan.""In reading this I note that there is no qualification for "quality." Does that matter? Does it have to be "good" to be artisan? Or is the commitment to the art/act of creation and the commitment to realize that vision enough?


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Edward
@edward
06/18/08 10:14:42PM
22 posts
To me, it means small quantity batches which would mean hand work, not enrobing tunnels or 500kg tempering vats, the use of fresh cream ("real" cream, like, from cows...) original ganaches, and a short shelf life (2-4 weeks).
Jeff
@jeff
06/18/08 11:30:29PM
94 posts
You want a real "Artisan Chocolatier" edward?Then call me. 1-888-899-2022I make sooooo many things that ONLY sell in my shop that have a 1-2 week shelf life its not even funny.Seriously, follow my links/name and I will sell you the best artisan style chocolates avaialable in america.Guarenteed.jeff
Edward
@edward
06/19/08 02:06:06AM
22 posts
Ummm....Actually I think I could direct you to my shop and website (albeit in Vancouver) where I make 20-25 varieties of chocolates. All hand work, all with fresh cream ganaches (well, except the Ital. nougat and the caramels...) and yes, all with about a 3 week shelf life.
Edward
@edward
06/19/08 11:08:42AM
22 posts
I don't think so, here are my views on shorter shelf life.The machine used is called a "Stephan" (sp?) which is very basically a robot-coupe with a vacuum machine attached. Oh, and fairly expensive, too, I might add.Even though the Stephan produces a ganache with excellent texture and mouthfeel, and technically gives you a long shelf life, the flavour of the ganache changes dramatically after 4-5 weeks. This change was explained to me like wine: Raw wine is put into bottles where spoilage is virtually eliminated, and as the wine ages it takes on better and more _mature_ flavours. The ganache, sealed in couverture, -while not prone to spoilage, takes on "different" flavours as it ages, and they are not very agreeable flavours. As well, most ganaches produced with the Stephan use a very high ratio of cream to couveture almost 1-1. While this contributes to optimal texture and mouthfeel, the couveture shell is not aluminum or glass, moisture will escape and the ganache filling will shrink over a two month period.Large chocolate mnfctrs cannot/will not use a cream based ganache,--no matter what technique or equipment used, as they need a minimum of 6 mnths shelf life for their products. Fondant is the name of the game here, as it can be flavoured any which way (with oils and flavouring compounds) and is very shelf stable. Sodium benzoate, sorbex, and other perseratives as well as complex sugars like trimoline also find their way into the mass produced stuff.The only way I can get around the whole shelf life thing is to offer "shelf stable" varieties. I offer about 18 cream based ganaches, but the other ones last longer: Nut based chocolates, (hedge-hogs, nut clusters) caramels (sigh... no fire kettle, all by hand!) Italian nougat, and fruit based pectin jellies.
Edward
@edward
06/19/08 09:56:56PM
22 posts
It has been my experience, as well as many others, that the flavour of a fresh cream ganache changes quite a bit over a 2 mth period. The texture does change, dramatically, as it 'shrinks" and "toughens up" due to moisture loss. I usually salt away a few "rejects" from a batch and examine them at 1, 2, 3, and 4 mth intervals.It is one thing to "adjust" for a flavour that will change--assumed that the item will be consumed , i.e. a fresh cream ganache AFTER the flavour change has taken place--i.e two months later. In this case the flavour of the ganache would be "off" if it were consumed within the first month, as it was designed to be consumed at a later stage. So either you make a ganache that tastes great for the first 4 weeks, or you make a ganache that tastes, uh, not so good for the first 4 weeks, but better after two months; but you can't have the cake and eat it as well.However, to make chocolate confections intended to be consumed two months later, smacks of mass production (well, at least to me, anyway).Thoughts?On a side note, is there a place on the forum to properly introduce myself? I guess I jumped in to a few threads without an intro. I am very glad I stumbled on this site, as there are very few sites devoted only to chocolate.
ChocoFiles
@chocofiles
06/19/08 10:20:52PM
251 posts
QUOTE: "On a side note, is there a place on the forum to properly introduce myself? I guess I jumped in to a few threads without an intro. I am very glad I stumbled on this site, as there are very few sites devoted only to chocolate."I think that the best way to introduce yourself would be to go to your own "My Page" and add an entry under "My Blog".
Edward
@edward
06/20/08 10:35:34AM
22 posts
Thanks, did that.
updated by @edward: 06/19/15 07:58:22PM
The Republic Of Chocolate
@the-republic-of-chocolate
06/20/08 04:47:45PM
5 posts
No machinery involved.... just a pair of hands, a dipping fork and a pot to heat the cream and of course passion!!!!!! now we are talking Artisan.
Clay Gordon
@clay
06/24/08 05:43:10PM
1,680 posts
Edward:There is an "Allow me To Introduce Myself" forum category, though I think a blog post might be more a more appropriate way to do it as Forum threads are really for subjects that invite a lot of interaction (like this one), where blog posts are really more about expressing viewpoints or perspectives that don't necessarily invite a lot of (or any) responses.


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
HANNA
@hanna
09/10/08 02:10:53AM
1 posts
Artisan dedication to finding the best beans (trekking through remote plantations in third world countries) and shipping them back home to roast and grind into chocolate.----------------------------------hannaGuaranteed ROI
Madame Cocoa
@madame-cocoa
11/02/08 10:07:04PM
5 posts
I did not see that anyone mentioned our newest group of proud artisan MAKERS, so I thought I'd give them a place here to describe themselves...it's the new Craft Chocolate Makers of America (www.craftchocolatemakers.org) crew. Check out their description. Hats off to them, I feel there is a great amount of education possible through the CCMA group and the opinions of this one in the future.
Bruce Toy (Coppeneur)
@bruce-toy-coppeneur
11/02/08 10:45:45PM
15 posts
Artisan bakers from Madagascar don't fly to Saskatchewan to find the best wheat and then ship it back home to grind into flour.
Vivian S. Richman
@vivian-s-richman
11/08/08 02:02:40AM
4 posts
An arisan, as defined by Merriam-Webster, is a craftsman. To my own definition, an artisan of chocolate, takes molded chocolate and embellishes the chocolate with myriad methods and either designs the shell or the center of the chocolate piece.
Laurent Liluthen
@laurent-liluthen
11/16/08 05:34:04PM
1 posts
Hi Gordon. I was very intrigue of this little pastry shop in Jackson WY. Chef Oscar Ortega its definitively a master in chocolate. He does a hot chocolate drink from bean to powder. I witnessed when one of his assistant was grinding the beans in a stone to form a paste, then he told me that they let it dry and then they will process it to do the powder that eventually will be the hot chocolate mix. Beside that he has a selection of 45 different incredible looking and delicious chocolate pieces. everything made on site.My curiosity didn't stop there so I google Chef Oscar Ortega and I found 4 full pages on google of information about him. next day I return to get my chocolate fix and surprisingly he was there dipping chocolates. He was no very friendly, but he wasn't rude. Seems like he does really take pride and concentration doing his art. Also in the shop were 5 impressive big chocolate sculptures, he said are chocolate showpieces he has done in past competitions.I will recommend to anyone who really would like to taste one of the best chocolatiers in the world visit Jackson Hole and cioccolato pastry shop.
Clay Gordon
@clay
11/16/08 08:15:21PM
1,680 posts
Laurent:Thanks for your note. I know Chef Ortega through his participation in the past two World Pastry Team Championships. He has been the coach of the Mexican teams. From my contact with him I know that he is seriously committed to doing good work. He also has a great sense of humor, but many chefs I know find it difficult to break out of the zone while they are in the middle of production. If you ever return to Jackson Hole and can visit the shop when Chef is not in production, my guess is that he will come across as more open and warm.Chef Ortega is one of the few chocolatiers in America who makes some of the chocolate he uses in his shop. I think that Chef is only making the chocolate he uses in his drinks, but I may be wrong about this.I second your recommendation. Anyone going to Jackson Hole should make it a point to stop by Chef Ortega's shop. And if you do, please take pictures and post them along with your impressions of his work. And say Hi! from me.Cioccolato Pastry Shop130 W. BroadwayJackson, WY 83001(307) 734.6400


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Ermina Nioki
@ermina-nioki
11/19/08 01:44:00AM
1 posts
I had the opportunity to visit Jackson hole and Chef Ortega cioccolato pastry shop few months ago, I was very very impress of the high quality of confections and service that Ortega and his staff gives to them customers. Chef Ortega's shop is clean and modern, with a great variety of European style chocolates and confections, he was very friendly in his own manner; as my husband asked him for the drakes chocolate piece he has he jumped out and wonder why he was looking for the darkest piece. He gave us a lesson on chocolate an its percentage, flavor, kind of bean and region. He also said to my husband that he probably doesn't even know what he likes and he just go for the darkest because American people will buy what ever is in the news. That made me laugh and that's why I see why Mr Clay said that Chef Oscar Ortega has a great sense of humor, he also is very young and full of energy and have a great passion for his career. He has a website www.cioccolato-pastryshop.com great place to get world class chocolates.
Greg
@greg
02/03/09 12:31:42PM
1 posts
My newly learned information indicates that one source of bean, and a label telling that source is also a part of this process, yes? and just to add, I agree that cooperations that pedal themselves as artisians are missing the point.
Artisan
@artisan
02/04/09 12:55:34PM
8 posts
I think the public view "artisan" associated with hand made, small batches and with methods of the past.But artisans of the past were not traditionalists, they would have been innovating for their time. So it is only normal that modern artisans continue on the path of innovation on flavours, techniques, equipment.For me the guiding principle of an artisan is that at the end of the day he/she is proud of his/her product.For me, artisan definitively means being proud of the chocolate products we make.
Clay Gordon
@clay
02/04/09 05:02:26PM
1,680 posts
If we follow this logic, is there no connection between the word artisan and "quality?" I can be proud of what I make - and it could be a real piece of garbage. Is it still "artisan?"It's a good question because there are other variables, such as cost, or being made by hand that all into the same category.I do have to agree that thinking about "artisan" as an attitude not an attribute strikes more closely to the heart of the matter.


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clay - http://www.thechocolatelife.com/clay/
Frank Schmidt
@frank-schmidt
02/05/09 05:28:23PM
28 posts
Heres my two cents worth.What is Artisan Chocolate? What does the word artisan mean in this usage?I think it is possible to clarify the current meaning of this word, as used in the early 21st Century, by looking at the subject from a new angle. By asking questions of what is not artisan.Because I live in a rural area of the country there are producers all around me who I dont think of as artisans. Because this is also an area attractive to crafts-people, there are many other neighbors who do think of themselves as artisan crafters. For example: Contrast a local herb farmer versus a local clay potter.Perhaps the herb farmer would like to be thought of as growing artisan herbs, he maybe could get a higher price for them if so called. Perhaps you could stretch the definition of artisan to cover herb growing but I think that few people would understand or accept that. No artisan herb farmer.The potter on the other hand has been thought of as an artisan crafter making wall sconce lamps, decorated sink bowls and place settings of dishes and mugs. Yes, artisan potter.A third example, something in-between: A local dairy farmer who bought land here, moved his special breed of dairy cattle here (southern Missouri) from Wisconsin. He grazes the cows in his manicured pastures, feeds them his special feeds, milks them and makes their milk into cheese curds for sale at his dairy and also at local grocery stores: So what say you? Is he an artisan dairyman or not?I think so. I think he has introduced the idea of design into his produce, his finished product. Correct, in my opinion: artisan cheese curds. Whats the difference? Well, there are things, efforts, which he has done to translate an idea (s),his ideas, some personal thoughts, into a finished product. With his elements of design this makes these finished products different/better (at least in his mind) than they would be if just made by formula by a farm hand or mechanic/tradesman. It is the introduction of design from the mind of the artisan which makes the product an artisan product.Also, it strikes me, does it you?, that there must be a close connection between the artisan and the finished product in fact. By the hand of the artisan this was made. Not to say that machines cant be used. A Swiss clockmaker working in his shop in the Alps may be an artisan and still use an electric lathe to make clock parts. But he is connected directly to the finished product. So now it is design plus personal connection to make a superior article. You can buy a factory made clock but not an artisan factory made clock. It may have been designed by an artisan but not artisan made.An artisan fishing lure? Sure! Designed and crafted by hand by a wood carver and painted by him. Yes, artisan fishing lure. Artisan fisherman? I think not. He didnt make anything. Even if he uses artisan lures? No.So what about chocolates? Does using artisan-made chocolate make the finished pieces artisan? Not if they are machine made without seeing the hand of the chocolatier and with no design input from the maker. No, just factory made chocolates; maybe very good tasting but not artisan. By this logic, all pastries made by hand in the restaurant kitchen with a little creative flair on top are artisan. I really dont have any problem with that. So few good things are handmade now days, adding design elements to a product above and beyond a cook-book recipe deserves being called artisan. But, Im sure some may not agree with this and the disagreement could be valid.Usually there is a factor of training or apprenticeship of the crafter under a master to become an artisan. Is this necessary? Maybe in some gilded trades. Not for chocolate making, I think. In the small, privately owned chocolate shops, there arent enough masters to train the artisans below them. You can be self taught in my opinion, in chocolate making. I think the chocolate is still artisan made if designed by and made by the hand of the chocolatier. Does this mean that a trainee filling molds at Christopher Elbows shop cannot by definition make artisan chocolates? Therefore the chocolates in the showcase are not artisan?Hummmm? Good Point.Are we any closer to defining artisan chocolate ? Maybe, maybe not..just my two cents worth.
Susie
@susie
02/05/09 11:01:15PM
11 posts
I noticed Starbucks had "small batch" coffee too. I haven't delved into it but wondered if it meant "relatively small compared to our other batches" or made in the back of the store...unlikely.As for your question I'd think it would depend on the source of the chocolate. But with the size of Starbucks it seems hard to believe an artisan could keep up the supply.
Susie
@susie
02/05/09 11:02:53PM
11 posts
So weird, just today I was wondering about Christopher Elbow's operation while in his shop!
Serena Ellis
@serena-ellis
09/07/09 02:10:21AM
1 posts
an artisan is craftperson that who crafts items that may be functional or decorative, clothing, jewelry, household items, and many other tools. they always make such Fair trade products with quality or sustainability to promote or serve in front of people . . .
Mark Heim
@mark-heim
09/08/09 07:56:49PM
101 posts
Artisan lable would be the same for any art form. Anyone can draw a picture, but not everyone is an artist. The artisan is someone who makes something that will evoke a feeling. Be it a painting, a book, a sculpture that makes you feel happiness, pride, empathy.... The same thing is for chocolate or confections. But with confections being a culinary art, it has to evoke the emotions with all 5 senses. Miss the effect on any of the 5 senses and it is not artisan.
holycacao
@holycacao
09/09/09 03:00:42PM
38 posts
They might if they had more money. in fact, I also would if I had more money.An artisan can create something that can be appreciated (in some cases, by many people), no matter what tools they are limited to. I think an artisan has an innate desire to create, and is constantly trying to do better.

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